man-of-war


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man-of-war

1. A warship. My grandfather was part of the crew on a man-of-war during World War II.
2. A nickname for the Portuguese man-of-war, a jellyfish-like sea creature with a deadly sting. I don't want you kids to go swimming today—there's been reports of a man-of-war in the water.
References in periodicals archive ?
Five hundred marines disembarked from the man-of-war to reinforce the British garrison in Boston.
For Loyalists in both New York and nearby Connecticut, the man-of-war was a secure base to which they could direct the intelligence they had gathered from Patriot conversations overhead in their towns and villages.
Aware that the Asia might try to stop them, Captain Lamb of the Provincial Artillery prepared his men for the possibility of an attack from the man-of-war.
The Loyalist managed to escape his captors and once again found refuge on the British man-of-war. Poughkeepsie's Rebels then banished Sarah Harris and she eventually joined her husband in New York City.
The man-of-war's sixty-four guns made sure that Rebels saw the futility of any further plans to abduct their loyal governor.
The plot to blow up the Asia was known to at least one man aboard the man-of-war, a Patriot prisoner held in the ship's brig.
The Portuguese man-of-war is a problem for swimmers because it floats just below the surface and is hard to see.
BLOB THE barrel jellyfish and Portuguese man-of-war are among eight species normally found in UK waters in summer
TERROR A man-of-war. Below, the beach where woman died
But yesterday a live 6in man-of-war was found in Kimmeridge Bay, with others seen at Burton Bradstock and Durdle Door.
Fearing the angry red mark was from a potentially lethal Portuguese man-of-war, club doctor David Gough gave Arca an injection of anti-histamine and sent him to hospital.
The Portuguese man-of-war is one of the most dangerous jellyfish in the ocean.
The left-back was having a swim after a run when he was stung by what club doctor David Gough reckons was a giant Portuguese man-of-war species at Seaburn beach.