man the barricades


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man the barricades

To launch or participate in a protest against some group, agency, or policy one disagrees with. People around the country are manning the barricades following the president's most recent policy announcement. I would be willing to man the barricades if some giant corporation ever tried to buy out our local businesses.
See also: barricade, man

man (or go to) the barricades

strongly protest against a government or other institution or its policy.
See also: barricade, man
References in periodicals archive ?
The People's Party has been reduced to rousing its followers to man the barricades in support of a spurious equality between homosexuality and the natural heterosexual relationship.
When an industry is besieged, it is necessary for all to discard parochial concerns and man the barricades.
Given their experience in Europe, where they had a justifiable fear of mass protest movements (which were often directed at them), nineteenth-century Jews were reluctant to man the barricades.
Stephen Gleeson Had to man the barricades without Davis during second half last week.
Ministers are all too keen to man the barricades in defence of their own interests while leaving ordinary people to pay the price of their brutal policies.
It's hardly a call to man the barricades or storm the Sisu citadel.
Now organisers are looking for people to man the barricades on Saturday and Sunday afternoons at the building in Wellington Street.
As fans tried to man the barricades at Man U across the city, Stuart Pearce was being wheeled out amid much optimism as the new manager of the Blues and a fitting tribute was being unveiled to their greatest ever boss, Joe Mercer.
A desire to subvert the norm, to depart from tradition, to man the barricades and tear up the rules?