make trouble

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make trouble

To act or behave in a troublesome manner; to cause problems or issues. I'm not trying to make trouble for anyone, but it's my duty to point out these inconsistencies in the accounts. Tom! Martin! Quit making trouble back there, or I'll send both of you to the principal's office!
See also: make, trouble

make trouble

to cause trouble or additional work. I don't want to make trouble, but I have a few suggestions that could make things work more smoothly.
See also: make, trouble
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick, Sir:- I address you upon the subject of sin the sinner I mean is a man named Winkle who makes trouble in his club by laughing and sometimes won't write his piece in this fine paper I hope you will pardon his badness and let him send a French fable because he can't write out of his head as he has so many lessons to do and no brains in future I will try to take time by the fetlock and prepare some work which will be all commy la fo that means all right I am in haste as it is nearly school time
They kissed last week, but the arrival of her twin, Paul, makes trouble for the pair.
The plot-line up to this point suggests the book might be a bleak read, but it is not; we sympathize with Binny but we see how she makes trouble for herself and we can enjoy the truly horrible James and the jagular that eats his hen.
Miss Mardle decides to make a fresh start, Agnes faces an unexpected obstacle close to home and Loxley makes trouble for Mr Selfridge.
7.10PM fIlM4 A PERFECT GETAWAY C5 11PM "Nothing bad happens in Hawaii, right?" Milla Jovovich and Kiele Sanchez are at risk as a serial killer makes trouble in a paradise lost.
Right in Kyle Hughes, a local police officer, but Marcie's own children frown on her new love, Kyle's family makes trouble for Marcie, and nothing seems to go right.
"Hit the rich tax plan makes trouble in Royal household" reported The Times.
Tony Benn A man who makes trouble for others is also making trouble for himself.
Willingness rather than coercion is the better way, "I think that anyone who makes trouble for his commander when there is a war on is making trouble for himself."
On board, a thieving servant makes trouble, too, and in a stop at the Greek island of Chios Hubert and his knight engage in a violent joust with a nasty knight and his squire over a suspected theft.
And the retro symbolism of "Jeannie" is, in hindsight, staggering: As Douglas notes, the "master" for whom the airheaded Jeannie makes trouble is that ultimate symbol of sixties male authority: an astronaut.
'Nothing bad happens in Hawaii, right?' Milla Jovovich and Kiele Sanchez (below) are at risk as a serial killer makes trouble in paradise.
So Bonner is probably right in saying that America's past toadying to Marcos makes trouble for America now.
At school, he's a model pupil but he really makes trouble at home.
Bianca is very proud of her, but it won't be long before she makes trouble in Albert Square.