make

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make

1. Literally, to bring something into existence; to bring about or cause to exist. Look at this table I made! Please don't make a mess.
2. To identify someone as a criminal or suspect of a crime. Did anyone make you as you left with the jewels? A witness tried to make the thief at the police lineup, but didn't feel confident about who was guilty.
3. To attend or participate in an event. I don't think I'll be able to make the game. I've got a lot of work I need to catch up on this weekend. I hope you can make the party!

make (one)

To identify one as a criminal or wrongdoer. Often used in passive constructions. You made sure nobody could make you while you stole the documents, right? By the time I realized I had been made, I could already hear the police sirens coming toward me.
See also: make

make someone

Sl. to identify someone. (Used especially in the context of law enforcement.) The cop stared at Wilbur and tried to make him, but failed to identify him and let him go. The cops took the suspect downtown where the police chief made him as a wanted criminal.

make something

to attend an event. I hope you can make our party. I am sorry, but I won't be able to make it.

make

 (an amount of) headway
1. Lit. to move forward. Even in a light wind, the ship could not make any headway.
2. Fig. to advance toward completing a task. With the help of Garret, Christopher made a lot of headway on the project.

make

1. tv. to identify someone. (Underworld.) We tried to make him down at the station but came up with nothing.
2. n. an identification. (Underworld.) We ran a make on her. She’s got two priors.
3. tv. to arrive at a place; to cover a distance. We made forty miles in thirty minutes.
4. tv. to achieve a specific speed. This buggy will make twice the speed of the old one.

make

/a mock of
To subject to ridicule; mock.

make

/go the rounds
1. To go from place to place, as on business or for entertainment: a delivery truck making the rounds; students going the rounds in the entertainment district.
2. To be communicated or passed from person to person: The news quickly made the rounds. A piece of juicy gossip is going the rounds.

make

/raise a stink Slang
To make a great fuss.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
1 : to form or put together out of material or parts <Do you know how to make a dress?>
"After years of hard work to make it so, PET recycling is now a successful part of our recycling efforts, paying between 10 cents and 20 cents per pound from the markets.
One of the most important human skills is our ability to use judgment and make choices, in other words, to make decisions.
"Finishes can make the barre sticky and hard to move along smoothly." He also feels wood is easier to maintain unfinished.
The bounded rationality of one individual makes this improbable, if not impossible (Allison & Zelikow, 1999; March, 1994; Simon, 1993).
Control by the de facto employer (as opposed to control by the welfare agency) makes the training seem more like a typical employer-employee relationship, thus suggesting that the payments should be includible in income.
It is central to all cinematic perception, but Fisher makes us sweat out eleven minutes vainly trying to catch the minute hand in motion.
Now, we must not allow the traditional carpet to become the industrialized carpeting that we have in the United States, though such an industry makes money.
Asking desktop end users to make records management decisions, in effect, makes every user a records manager.
Success as an adult-does gender makes a difference for graduates with mental disabilities?
Daimler-Chrysler, which patented the combination of abaca and PP, and Manila Cordage in the Philippines, which makes the abaca fiber roving, were co-winners of the JEC award.
Guy Mariano does a switch 360 flip down some stairs which makes me wonder what kind of tricks he'd be doing now if he were still skating.
It makes falling in cabins less traumatic; it makes floors feel cleaner and warmer to bare feet on a cold morning; and greatly improves the acoustics of meeting rooms.
Says Liu: "It basically increases the efficiency of the discovery process to the point where it makes it practical to look for rare, unexpected reactions."
The prospect of cheap cellulosic ethanol makes it possible to envision a very different energy landscape.