make believe

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make believe

1. verb To pretend. When I was a kid, I used to love to make believe I was an astronaut flying to Mars in my rocket ship, which was really a cardboard box. It's fun to make believe! You can be anyone you want!
2. noun Something imagined; something that does not exist in reality. In this usage, the term is usually hyphenated. The make-believe we engage in as children lays the foundation for our ability to be creative later in life. A lot of people dismiss these movies as simple make-believe, but they contain a very complex mythology. Are you telling the truth about what happened, or is this all just make-believe?
3. adjective Imagined or pretended. In this usage, the term is usually hyphenated. Do they really expect us to fall for these make-believe explanations?
See also: believe, make

make believe

Pretend, as in Let's make believe we're elves. This expression in effect means making oneself believe in an illusion. [Early 1700s]
See also: believe, make

make beˈlieve (that...)

pretend (that...): The journey seemed like an attempt to make believe that the modern world didn’t exist.a world of fantasy and make-believe
See also: believe, make

make believe

To pretend.
See also: believe, make
References in periodicals archive ?
While some make-believe play is active, such as cops and robbers, it doesn't necessarily have to be energetic, says Reissland, pointing out that kids might enjoy pretending they're a mushroom, for example, or a princess sitting on her throne.
Make-believe. This is where Atticus says, "I rest my case." But for the stubborn few who still think fiction doesn't matter, imagine a world without it.
Making sure that make-believe play not only happens but reaches its well-developed form.
The four-country research project which forms the core of Media and the Make-Believe Worlds of Children provides a creative and insightful addition to the growing body of work on how children process the content of their media world and integrate it in their lives.
But before the audience could revel in this self-proclaimed "temple of silent art and make-believe," a lot of work had to be done.
The factory not only sells its workers' time at the keyboard, but as the players move through the levels, they wrack up virtual gold coins and other make-believe rewards.
The youngsters have all been invited to apply for make-believe positions which have been advertised in their own school paper, the Manor Park Times.
A private view was held at Compton Verney of two newexhibitions - Only Make-Believe: Ways of Playing and Salvator Rosa: Wild Landscapes.
A diverse cross-section of kids played with make-believe buddies, the team found.
This issue highlights an investigation of infant and toddler child care providers' cultural competence and the demographic correlates of that competence; an examination of the impact of family home learning activities and preschool participation on children's success in kindergarten; a qualitative investigation of timekeeping constructs of 4- and 5-year-old children in Mexico and the southern United States; a study of the achievement, creativity, and problem-solving abilities of a group of multiage elementary students; and an investigation of the relationship between time spent in make-believe play and young children's ability to delay gratification.
They inhabit a parallel universe of make-believe and when real life intrudes it comes as a terrible shock.
For serious viewers, who bring imagination and memory to the displays, the potential of inhabiting a chair, say, or a bed adds to the show's enticement, much like children who can enter the make-believe world of the dollhouse.
An experiment investigated the effect of a make-believe fantasy mode of problem presentation on reasoning about valid conditional syllogisms in three groups of 5-year-old children: a) school children from middle-class families in England; b) school children from middle-class families in Brazil; and, c) children from low SES families in Brazil who had never gone to school.
Engagingly written and distinctively illustrated with photography utilizing authentic folk art and handcrafted props in make-believe scenarios, by Stefan Czernecki, Ride'Em Cowboy takes young readers ages 4 to 7 seven through a day's work on the range.
Kids can act out some of the scenes, dress up in a special section devoted to make-believe, and even create their own Saturday Evening Post cover.