make (one's) mark

(redirected from make his mark)

make (one's) mark

To do something that will be remembered or that makes one famous or successful; to do something that is very important or meaningful. The actress first made her mark with her incredible performance as Lady Macbeth on Broadway. I chose to pursue a career in medical research so that I might someday make my mark in the world with a groundbreaking discovery.
See also: make, mark

make one's mark

to do something that allows one to receive appropriate recognition. Perry made his mark by inventing a special kind of holder for a cell phone.
See also: make, mark

make your mark

or

make a mark

COMMON
1. If you make your mark or make a mark, you do something which causes you to become noticed or famous. Today we look at the new generation of Japanese directors making their mark in world cinema. She's only been with the company for three months but she's certainly made her mark. He was new to politics and had not yet made a mark.
2. If something makes its mark or makes a mark, it starts to be noticed or to have an effect. The film has already made its mark in terms of awards. If cricket ever made a mark in the United States, it would be guys like Bevan who would sell it.
See also: make, mark

make your mark

become famous and successful.
See also: make, mark

ˌmake your ˈmark

become famous because you are very good at something: He’s an actor who has made his mark in comedy shows.
See also: make, mark
References in classic literature ?
Je suis capitaine de chasseurs (Heyward well knew that the other was of a regiment in the line); j'ai ici, avec moi, les filles du commandant de la fortification.
So they made this song about her: `Laboissiere, dis moi.
moi, je veux cinquante mille francs de rente, et alors"
It's headed, 'A Necessary Explanation,' with the motto, 'Apres moi le deluge
Apportez moi a le consuelo Britannique, s'il vous plait," he would say, for he was by no means ignorant of French.
The hubbub within the chamber did not cease, however, but rather increased, with yells of: "A moi, mes amis