make haste


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make haste

To move, speak, or act quickly, especially when one was being too slow before. Often said as a command. We'll need to make haste if we're going to catch that train! Make haste, Jonathan, I need that report ASAP!
See also: haste, make

make haste

Also, make it snappy. Hurry up, move or act quickly, as in If you don't make haste we'll be late, or Make it snappy, kids. The first expression was first recorded in Miles Coverdale's 1535 translation of the Bible (Psalms 39:13): "Make haste, O Lord, to help me." The variant dates from the early 1900s and uses snappy in the sense of "resembling a sudden jerk." The oxymoron make haste slowly, dating from the mid-1700s, is a translation of the Latin festina lente. It is used either ironically, to slow someone down (as in You'll do better if you make haste slowly), or to comment sarcastically on a lack of progress (as in So far the committee has been making haste slowly).
See also: haste, make

make haste

To move or act swiftly; hurry.
See also: haste, make