make an offer

make an offer

To present, proffer, or propose something (to someone), especially an amount of money. A noun or pronoun can be used between "make" and "an offer" to specify the person to whom the offer is being made. We know you're being sought after by several different firms, which is why we'd like you make an offer of a $200,000-per-year salary, which is much higher than any of our competitors are going to offer. A: "How much would you want for that Ford Mustang in your driveway?" B: "I wasn't planning on selling it, but make me an offer."
See also: make, offer
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

make someone an offer

to offer someone an amount of money for something. (Usually an invitation.) Do you like it? Make me an offer.
See also: make, offer
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"This announcement does not constitute a firm intention to make an offer and, accordingly, there can be no certainty that any offer will be made."
Sullivan was dismissive of Fernandes' announcement, claiming no serious bidder would use such a medium to make an offer, and Allardyce added: "It's a dangerous thing, Twitter!"
Springer added that it had no financial interest in MGN and had made no offer to the British group, nor was it in a position to know whether it would make an offer.
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