make a pitch

make a pitch

To make a presentation to influence others to support, purchase, or agree to something. Wanda will be making a pitch for her new product idea at the meeting today. I tried to make a pitch for you to join the band, but the others guys aren't sure about it.
See also: make, pitch

make a pitch (for someone or something)

Fig. to say something in support of someone or something; to attempt to promote, sell, or advance someone or something. Bill is making a pitch for his friend's new product again. The theatrical agent came in and made a pitch for her client. Every time I turn on the television set, someone is making a pitch.
See also: make, pitch

make a pitch

COMMON
1. If you make a pitch for something, you tell people how good that thing is and try to persuade them to support it or buy it. The president used his remarks to make a pitch for further space exploration. The ability to persuade and convince is vital when you are making a pitch to a new client.
2. If you make a pitch for something, you try to get it. So far he hasn't made a pitch for the job. When we first opened the restaurant, we made a pitch for young, stylish customers.
See also: make, pitch

make a pitch

make a bid to obtain a contract or other benefit.
Pitch is used here in the late 19th-century colloquial sense of a sales pitch.
See also: make, pitch
References in periodicals archive ?
If you're in a game and you gotta think about keeping your front side closed when you gotta get Bernie Williams with the bases loaded in Yankee Stadium, you better call time and get somebody in there who can make a pitch. Keeping your front side closed isn't going to get Bernie Williams out.