make a beeline for

make a beeline for (someone or something)

To head directly and quickly toward something or some place. I knew the boss was angry, so when I saw her come in, I made a beeline for the break room. Every day when I come home from work, my toddler makes a beeline for me—it's just the cutest thing.
See also: beeline, make

make a beeline for someone or something

Fig. to head straight toward someone or something. (Alludes to the straight flight of a bee.) Billy came into the kitchen and made a beeline for the cookies. After the game, we all made a beeline for John, who was serving cold drinks.
See also: beeline, make

make a beeline for

Go straight to, as in He made a beeline for the refreshments. In this expression, beeline means "the shortest distance between two points," alluding to the route of worker bees bringing nectar and pollen back to the hive. [c. 1830]
See also: beeline, make

make a beeline for

go rapidly and directly towards.
The phrase refers to the straight line supposedly taken instinctively by a bee returning to its hive.
1997 Bookseller And when he heard that people might like him to sign copies of his new novel…he cut the small talk and made a beeline for the stall.
See also: beeline, make

make a beeline for

Go directly to. This phrase is based on the assumption that a bee will take the shortest, most direct route back to the hive, in effect a straight line. It appeared in the Massachusetts Spy on November 24, 1830: “The squirrel took a beeline and reached the ground six feet ahead.”
See also: beeline, make
References in periodicals archive ?
First off, we asked you where the phrase to make a beeline for something comes from.
If anyone knows any differently, make a beeline for that postbox and let us know.
Feeling adrift, I make a beeline for the Inn at the Willows and its evening Pagan Ritual, where a group of saronged hippie chicks in flower wreaths are holding hands around a maypole.
The next time we see an upcoming John Lennon or Madonna on the horizon, in addition to polishing his or her craft, he or she needs to make a beeline for this book.
Remembering the orientation of her sister bee's waggle dance back at the hive, the bee veers off at the same angle to make a beeline for lunch.
The preponderance of newsworthy fraudsters receiving suspended prison sentences allowing them to make a beeline for TV studios paying generous fees, suggests that crime does pay after all.
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