mail (something) to (one)

(redirected from mailing to)

mail (something) to (one)

To send a letter or package through the postal system to one. I've got to mail this check to the phone company before they shut off my phone lines! I'll have to leave some things here when I move—will you be able to mail them to me later?
See also: mail

mail something to someone

to send something to someone by mail. I mailed the check to you yesterday. I mailed a gift to my niece.
See also: mail
References in periodicals archive ?
You'll find who they are and what they're mailing to help you find prospects for your products and services or to determine the best strategies for your own DM promotions.
To a college or university mailing to 50,000 alumni, a 15 percent increase could mean that 7,500 additional mailings "connect." And in an annual drive where 15 percent of the average alumnus contribution is $100, that mailing bump can translate to an additional $112,500 (not including the savings on return postage and printing costs)--no small change.
When mailing to existing customers, your long-term objective is to strengthen your relationship through personal, one-to-one communication and to keep your shop top-of-mind with your customers and remind them how much you appreciate their business.
In fact, the mailing list is so important, you may discover that mailing to different, tested lists ups your response rate by as much as 60%.
The purpose of such a mailing is customer acquisition: You want to turn this person into a customer by designing the mailing to generate an order.
The same package sent "air printed matter" from the mail room to Europe would cost $2.16 per piece; first-class mailing to Europe would cost $3.40.
After doing a test mailing to see if a borrowed list would give a good return, Richard Parker and Associates wold "roll out,' mailing to the entire list.
Such are the risks of "mass mailing to one person." Keep track of how and at what price each of your subscribers came in and mail to them accordingly.--F.G.
For example, the American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C., recently had a massive catalog mailing to Canada.
I've heard "experts" say, for a national mailing, that Iowa and Maryland are usually representative responders and you could test by mailing to those states.
Plus, in mid-November Lessiter sent a follow-up newsletter subscription mailing to 1,200 people who had ordered special reports from the Labor Day mailing but had not subscribed.
A difference of 10.5 percent is more than enough, projected to the full mailing to pay the cost of the BREs, but in all honesty it's certainly not a large enough difference in results to be statistically significant.