maggot


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act the maggot

behave in a foolishly playful way. Irish informal
See also: act, maggot

maggot

1. n. a cigarette. (Probably a play on faggot.) Can I bum a maggot off of you?
2. n. a low and wretched person; a vile person. You maggot! Take your hands off me!
References in periodicals archive ?
In maggot therapy, clean, sterile, baby maggots (one to two millimetres) are applied to a wound for a three-day period in a special sealed bag, allowing them to breathe but not escape.
But the maggots keep coming back and the council just fob me off every time.
Veronica Nilson, 79, who lives on the ground floor, says she has to sweep maggots away from the hallway outside her apartment daily - but they keep coming back in their hundreds.
Netting generally is placed over the dressing to prevent maggot escape from the wound bed.
The diner, who asked not to be named and has since put in an official complaint, said: "We got a table by the window and the food was nice but when we were halfway through the meal, maggots started falling on my head.
They are attracted to dirty, unhygienic conditions to lay their eggs which then hatch into maggots.
Partner Phillip Wells, 54, said: "We now know why the pain was so intense - the maggot was having a chew on her nerve endings.
Could the Spoon Monster be a grandson of the Moat Maggot and are future generations of "Magoons" breeding in the murky depths of the moat?
Importance of live maggots in the treatment of wounds, though known from ancient times, was highlighted when Doctors from the Canberra hospital treated an elderly man injured in an accident and lying unconscious in the bush for two days.
When maggots come forth like a swarming army crossin' the ridgeline, it's rotten meat.
aeruginosa could be treated with an agent that interrupts bacterial signalling to ensure the success of maggot therapy and thereby wound healing.
Since Wirral Council started collecting household waste fortnightly instead of weekly, some residents' bins have become a breeding ground for maggots.
Your vote: page 20 more Maggot therapy is becoming popular again For centuries, maggots were used by physicians for treating wounds, but they fell into disuse with the widespread introduction of antibiotics in the 1940s.
The use of maggots to clean necrotic wounds, known as maggot debridement therapy (MDT), has been recorded since the 1500s.