make (one's) peace with (someone or something)

(redirected from made their peace with)

make (one's) peace with (someone or something)

To reconcile with or accept something that previously was a source of stress, conflict, etc. After years of not speaking, Janie finally made peace with her sister. You need to make your peace with the fact that your first business didn't succeed. There will be other chances.
See also: make, peace

make one's peace with

Reconcile oneself to, bring about friendly relations with, as in He's repented and made his peace with God. This expression was first recorded about 1315. Also see make peace.
See also: make, peace

make (your) ˈpeace with somebody

end an argument, a quarrel, etc. with somebody, for example by saying sorry to them: He made his peace with his mother just before she died. OPPOSITE: pick a fight/quarrel (with somebody)
See also: make, peace, somebody

make (one's) peace with

To bring oneself to accept; reconcile oneself to.
See also: make, peace
References in classic literature ?
The landlord eyed him over but did not find him as good as Don Quixote said, nor even half as good; and putting him up in the stable, he returned to see what might be wanted by his guest, whom the damsels, who had by this time made their peace with him, were now relieving of his armour.
In an exclusive interview with the Sunday Mirror, Ronaldo reckons that it's time Ireland sat down and made their peace with the fiery Manchester United captain, who walked out of the 2002 World Cup after a blazing bust-up with then manager Mick McCarthy.
They have long since made their peace with Caesar, dropping any pretence to a prophetic voice.
ENGLAND'S club bosses have made their peace with Sven Goran Eriksson by making him their president.
Aristocrats were less willing to associate with merchants by the middle of the next century; having made their peace with the King's bureaucrats, they came ultimately to see the world through his eyes.
By and large, however, most have made their peace with living on the fault line.
But there is a more general point that his work illustrates, which is that even at this late date American literature and thought have not yet made their peace with middle-class life.
In an exclusive interview with the Sunday Mirror, Ronaldo reckons it's time the Republic sat down and made their peace with the fiery Manchester United captain, who walked out of the 2002 World Cup after a blazing bust-up with then manager Mick McCarthy.