make sense

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make sense

1. To be understandable or coherent. These numbers don't make sense. How can there be a deficit if we also have an excess? I've tried asking him but his explanations aren't making any sense.
2. To be practical or seem like a good idea. It doesn't make sense to drive all the way home when we'll need to leave again almost as soon as we get there. If you think you might want to go to college there, visiting for a weekend just makes sense.
See also: make, sense
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

make sense

to be understandable. John doesn't make sense. What John says makes sense to me.
See also: make, sense
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

make sense

1. Be understandable. This usage, first recorded in 1686, is often used in a negative context, as in This explanation doesn't make sense.
2. Be reasonable, wise, or practical, as in It makes sense to find out first how many will attend the conference. This term employs sense in the meaning of "what is reasonable," a usage dating from 1600. In Britain it is also put as stand to sense.
See also: make, sense
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

make ˈsense


1 have a meaning that you can easily understand: This sentence doesn’t make sense — there’s no verb in it.
2 be a sensible or practical thing to do: It makes sense to buy a house now because prices will certainly go up soon.
3 be easy to understand or explain: John wasn’t making much sense on the phone.
See also: make, sense
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

make sense

1. To be coherent or intelligible: an explanation that made sense.
2. To be practical or advisable: It makes sense to go now.
See also: make, sense
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From a conceptual point of view, it made sense to place the LTD and workers' comp insurance funding in the captive as well, Young said.
Because the angels were strangers, it made sense that the people would be curious and have a desire to know the men.
UICI President and Chief Executive Officer Greg Mutz said selling its interest in SeniorsFirst back to Hanson "just made sense."
His contribution made sense, since the artist continually reframes the legacy of midcentury modernism's themes of science, industry, and globalism in such pieces as Le Baiser/The Kiss, 1999, a video in which the artist plays a window washer cleaning Mies's Farnsworth House; and in Cloud Prototype No.
But it made sense. During the past two years, in parking lots along the Black Horse and White Horse Pikes--seamy commercial strips in South Jersey--they'd been picking up street dealers with Ecstasy as well as their traditional products, cocaine and heroin.
In general, Kathleen's instructional activities emphasized tasks wherein she did not give students specific procedures for finding a solution; instead she encouraged them to complete the tasks in ways that made sense to them (Wheatley, 1991; Wheatley & Reynolds, 1999).
She always checked whether what she read made sense and when the reading didn't make sense to her she would ask herself "What does that mean?" and "I never heard that." In the following example of Melissa's reading it is evident that she orchestrates a variety of strategies to derive meaning from the book Danny and the Easter Egg by Edith Kunhardt.
This made sense when the Supreme Court's job was to interpret laws that legislative assemblies enacted.
Offering an affordable online venue for ads made sense," said Cynthia McFarland, managing editor of Anglicans Online.
"I can't remember much about those talks and times now apart from an overwhelming feeling that it all made sense, " said the Welsh-born minister.