lie with (one)

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lie with (one)

1. Literally, to recline alongside one. He lay with me on the rug while we listened to music.
2. To be decided by one; to depend on or rest with one; to be up to one. You know where we stand, but the decision ultimately lies with you. I'd feel better about this if the success of the whole thing didn't lie with someone we don't know.
3. old-fashioned A euphemism meaning to have sexual intercourse with one. He giggled when I asked if he wanted to lie with me. I guess it's not something most college students would say.
See also: lie

lie with someone

 
1. to recline with someone. Come and lie with me and we will keep warm. Jimmy and Franny were lying with each other to keep warm.
2. Euph. to recline with someone and have sex. She claimed he asked her to lie with him. Do you mean to imply that she lay with him?
See also: lie

lie with

Be decided by, dependent on, or up to. For example, The choice of restaurant lies with you. Starting about 1300 this phrase meant "to have sexual intercourse with," a usage that is now obsolete. [Late 1800s]
See also: lie

lie with

v.
1. To be decided by, dependent on, or up to someone or something: Most of the country's wealth still lies with the elite. The fault lies with the negligent parents, not with the children. The prisoner's fate now lies with the governor.
2. Archaic To have sexual intercourse with someone.
See also: lie
References in classic literature ?
The living in this manner with him, and his with me, was certainly the most undesigned thing in the world; he often protested to me, that when he became first acquainted with me, and even to the very night when we first broke in upon our rules, he never had the least design of lying with me; that he always had a sincere affection for me, but not the least real inclination to do what he had done.
Thus, it could be argued that lying with malicious, bad or immoral intent takes place later in life.
This is another aspect of lying with which it is hard to disagree.
She explains the nature of political action in the context of lying with surprising consequences that run against modern intuitions and threatens to change our understanding of the history of politics.