lull (one) into (something)

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lull (one) into (something)

To cause one to fail to be aware of the risks, dangers, or true reality of a situation. Installing cameras at home lulled me into a false sense of security—our house still ended up getting robbed. A: "I can't believe you were able to unseat the valedictorian!" B: "I think three years of accolades lulled her into complacency."
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lull into

Deceive into trustfulness, as in The steadily rising market lulled investors into a false sense of security. The earliest recorded version of this term referred to wine: "Fitter indeed to bring and lull men asleep in the bed of security" (Philemon Holland, Pliny's Historie of the World, 1601. Today it still often appears with the phrase a false sense of security.
See also: lull
References in periodicals archive ?
Theodore Taylor, The Cay> They were lulled into believing his promises.
MARTIN O'Neill will not be lulled into a false sense of security this evening - because he feels the truly 'big' teams like Manchester United can cope better with lulls than Villa.
The Prison Service must not be lulled into a false sense of security after the number of jail suicides nationally fell by nearly a fifth last year, a prison reform group said today.
It's all too easy to be lulled into a false sense of optimism by the success of airline deregulation.
Dino-size kudos to Mike Milne, the director of computer animation: The visuals are so persuasive you could, if not careful, be lulled into believing you're watching the real thing.
Women who regularly examine their own breasts and don't find lumps shouldn't be lulled into a "false sense of security," Thomas says.
While homeowners should feel reassured that the mulch they buy for their spring planting is not likely to transport termites, they shouldn't be lulled into a false sense of security, thinking that termites are not an important problem that can and should be prevented with the help of a pest professional.
Educators and business people should not be lulled into a false sense of security regarding Internet use during school and work hours," said Dan Jude, Security Software's president.