lowbrow


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lowbrow

1. adjective Unrefined, uncultured, or unintellectual, as in style, content, or quality; coarse or vulgar. I used to look down on people who watched lowbrow movies and TV shows in their spare time, but as I've gotten older I've started to see the appeal in it. The premise is clever enough, but it's so overladen with lowbrow humor that I could never really enjoy it fully.
2. noun A person with such tastes or opinions. I thought the crass jokes were appalling, but all the lowbrows in the audience obviously thought they were hilarious. You wonder how anyone could enjoy such drivel, until you remember the sheer number of lowbrows there are in this country.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lowbrow

(ˈlobrɑʊ)
1. n. a nonintellectual person; an anti-intellectual person. Some lowbrow came in and made a stink about not being able to find any Gene Autry records.
2. mod. nonintellectual; anti-intellectual. I like my lowbrow music and my lowbrow friends!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
'Bad Bird is the strongest concept under Lowbrow and it is our own invention.
while lowbrow, being low, stands for the very opposite--popular, conventional, generic, conforming, simple, entertaining, emotional, personal and unhealthy, etc.--so the eclectic mix of high- and lowbrow may happen in a literary work by juxtaposing any feature with that in the opposite camp, for instance, conventional with inventive, conformity with individuality, art with entertainment, complexity with simplicity, social with personal, etc.
They want grilled cheese, hot dogs, hamburgers, a taco truck, a doughnut wall, something lowbrow," (https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/921422/meghan-markle-wedding-news-prince-harry-food-reception-guests-latest) Bloomingdale said .
He thus concludes, commensurate with the "mass or popular culture" described by Adorno and Horkheimer (Barker, 2009: 49), that in our era "highbrow" and "lowbrow" have compromised themselves, creating a situation in which "nobrow", i.e., genre or popular fictions or whatever, dominates (Swirski, 2005b).
In 1902 this led naturally to a new word, "lowbrow" In 1949 this curious terminology grew more popular.
And doesn't lowbrow feed more lowbrow, and that still more, until the already abysmal tone of modern politics grates so hard on the nerves that all you want to do is to retreat into P.D.
"The Lowbrow Reader Reader: Writings and Drawings from World-Renown Comedy Journal" is a collection of articles and interviews from the thoughtful and highly sophisticated Lowbrow Reader magazine.
The film is a shoddy package of lowbrow gags and hyper melodrama.
Gazing at the irrefutable optimism depicted in these glossy candy colors and wee winks and smiles, it is difficult not to refer to Takashi Murakami's Superflat movement, and the associated (total bringdown) criticism that the work is little more than lowbrow, pop-concepts thrust into a highbrow arena.
Though Rand isn't around for the Twilight craze (she died in 1982), her own tastes sometimes ran to the lowbrow. In his chronicle of the 1970s, Mad as Hell (Knopf), Dominic Sandbrook writes that she adored the TV series Charlie's Angels, which she called "the only romantic television show today."
Described as "carnivalesque," in the history of gothic/noir art movements supplied in the introduction, lowbrow art often fuses elements of pop culture with surrealism, resulting in dark satire and surprising juxtaposition.
With a raucous sense of humor and an unparalleled sense of soundplay, Canadian poet RC Weslowski is sort of a linguistic dervish, a dizzying storm of lowbrow comedy and surrealist metaphor.
In his proposed book, Sousa's Washington, Warfield intends to document and illuminate the interconnectedness between black and white, highbrow and lowbrow, professional and amateur, and military and civilian musicians, through a detailed investigation of the early career of John Philip Sousa.
Cult Magazines: A to Z, A Curious Compendium of Culturally Obsessive & Curiously Expressive Publications (NonStop) is a joy, although it lacks the encyclopedic pretensions hinted at by the "A to Z." Edited by Earl Kemp and Luis Ortiz, the book is a copiously illustrated guide to eye-poppingly weird publications, mostly from the 1930s through the '60s, that explored saucy sex, UFOs, hot rods, the supernatural, "hygiene," and lowbrow comedy.
Chinese regulators this year have shut down dozens of online games designed overseas and ordered developers to stop including "lowbrow" content like monster-hunting in games.