low-rent


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low-rent

1. Literally, not costing much to rent. Typically used before a noun. There is a serious shortage of low-rent accommodation in the city, which has led to a homelessness crisis unlike anything we've seen before. The university is converting some of its derelict properties into low-rent offices and studio apartments.
2. Very cheap or inferior in quality. You can tell these toys are just low-rent knockoffs of the original. The studio became infamous for pumping out low-rent horror films several times a year.
3. Having low moral and social standards. He planned the whole operation, then hired a couple low-rent goons to do the dirty work for him. What does some low-rent junkie like you know about an honest day's work?

low rent

1. n. a low person; someone without grace or spirit. (Also a rude term of address.) Look, low rent, where is what you owe me?
2. mod. cheap; unfashionable. This place is strictly low rent.
See also: low, rent
References in periodicals archive ?
The Court of Appeals ruling reversed an earlier decision by the Appellate Court that invalidated the low-rent, flat-dollar increases approved in 2008, and again in 2009, by the RGB.
The low-rent, flat-dollar increases applied to tenants who lived in their apartments for six years or more.
Since the median income for apartments renting for less than $450 is $15,000, Michael McKee of the New York State Tenants & Neighbors Coalition called the proposed $15 low-rent supplement a "poor tax."
A low-rent supplement of $15 has also been proposed for apartments renting for $400 or less.
Tucker finds that the rents in free market cities follow a standard bell curve, with a steep climb on the low-rent side of the curve and a long tail toward the "luxury' end of the market.
Loft-dwelling tenants would receive the same increase as those in stabilized apartments, including the low-rent supplement, but a vacancy increase is not proposed.
The deal is unusual in that West and Segal cut a deal with A&P, which had abandoned the building but held a long-term low-rent lease, another deal with the owner and yet another deal with the lender.
The demand for decent, affordable rentals in Manhattan has burgeoned in the last six months and brokers report a lack of new product, light turnover of low-rent apartments, and a decrease in shares contributing to the trend.
One of Hannon's bigger disappointments was not being able to address the issue of low-rent hardship buildings.
Currently, according to the Citizens Housing and Planning Council in a recent article in this newspaper, the city is managing 40,000 units of occupied, middle- and low-rent in rem apartments.