lovely

(redirected from lovelies)
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I had a lovely time.

 and We had a lovely time.
a polite expression of thanks to the host or hostess. Fred: Good-bye. I had a lovely time. Bill: Nice to have you. Do come again. Jane: We had a lovely time. Mary: Thank you and thanks for coming.
See also: lovely, time

I've had a lovely time.

 and We've had a lovely time.
a polite expression said to a host or hostess on departure. Bob: I've had a lovely time. Thanks for asking me. Fred: We're just delighted you could come. Good night. Bob: Good night. Sue: We've had a lovely time. Good night. Bill: Next time don't stay away so long. Good night.
See also: lovely, time

Lovely weather for ducks,

 and Fine weather for ducks.
Cliché a greeting meaning that this unpleasant rainy weather must be good for something. Bill: Hi, Bob. How do you like this weather? Bob: Lovely weather for ducks. Sally: What a lot of rain! Tom: Yeah. Lovely weather for ducks. Don't care for it much myself.
See also: duck, lovely, weather

thank you for a lovely evening

an expression said by a departing guest to the host or hostess at the end of an evening. (Other adjectives, such as nice, can be used in place of lovely.) Mary: Thank you for a lovely evening. John: Will I see you again? Bill: Thank you for a nice evening. Mary: Thank you so much for coming. Good night.
See also: evening, lovely, thank

thank you for a lovely time

an expression said by a departing guest to the host or hostess. (Other adjectives, such as nice, can be used in place of lovely.) Bill: Thank you for a nice time. Mary: Thank you so much for coming. Bye now. John: Thank you so much for coming. Jane: Well, thank you for a lovely time. John: Don't stay away so long next time.
See also: lovely, thank, time

everything in the garden is lovely (or rosy)

all is well. informal
Everything in the garden is lovely was an early 20th-century catchphrase, originating in a song popularized by the English music-hall artiste Marie Lloyd ( 1870–1922 ), and is used as an expression of general satisfaction and contentment.

everything in the garden is ˈlovely/ˈrosy

(British English, saying, often ironic) everything is satisfactory, is going well, or could not be better: She pretends that everything in the garden is rosy, but I’ve heard that she’s heavily in debt.

lovely and ˈwarm, ˈcold, ˈquiet, etc.

(British English, spoken) used when you are emphasizing that something is good because of the quality mentioned: It’s lovely and warm in here.
See also: and, lovely