love-in


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Related to love-in: making love, Love poems

love-in

1. A gathering focused on personal pleasure involving music, drugs, and sexual acts. Margaret reminisced about when she used to attend love-ins in the '60s.
2. A situation involving lavish mutual praise and admiration. The office party became a love-in as the managers all congratulated each other on their various accomplishments.

love-in

1. n. an event during the 1960s where one or more couples made love in a public place. My uncle was at one of those love-ins, and he said if anything was going on, it was going on under blankets.
2. n. an event in the 1960s where everyone became euphoric—with the help of marijuana—about love and respect for their fellow humans. Everyone at the annual company love-in was throwing love bombs around at each other.
References in periodicals archive ?
Flower festivals, love-ins, seemingly endless days of transendental meditation made it look - especially to a post-war generation of parents - that their children were quietly slipping into the abyss of sloth.
What regulatory events and consultations are they planning at my expense that are related to the questions asked - love-ins or prayer meetings?
By 1967-68 nihilistic rioting was transformed into be-ins, sit-ins, and love-ins in the quest for new forms of identity which challenged that ancient British convention-the Puritan work ethic.
It is the latest of a number of regional love-ins designed, one suspects, to reach out to the country, and present a more human face.
Have moved on from Posh and Becks to John and Yoko with their tedious bed love-ins.
It's been 40 years since the Summer of Love introduced the world to Flower Power, love-ins and the Haight-Ashbury District and made San Francisco the capital of the hippie counterculture movement.
They sliver, drip honey cloaked in free verse At journalistic love-ins, awaiting the Fall.
Although quite enjoyable, the books are a product of their time, and the reader is transported to the early 1970's with references to hippies, love-ins, the fuzz (the police), phonograph records, bellbottom dungarees, young people whose motto was "never trust anybody over thirty," and electric typewriters.
Hunter shares intimate details with the reader--how they smelled and how they felt, wheelhouse diatribes, poetic musings on the broken wildness of the coast and accounts of their brief counter-culture incursions or love-ins at coastal communities.
There were the "-ins" of the 1960s: sit-ins, love-ins, wade-ins (swimming at segregated beaches), and wed-ins (hippie marriages).
AI groupies Melissa Etheridge and Tammy Lynn Michaels tried to soften the blow by having her over for dinner, but let's face it-all of the lesbian love-ins in the world won't get our Idol Most Likely to Perform in a Bathhouse back into the competition.
My concerts are like love-ins,'' he says, coining a phrase from the 1960s.
But, far from being described as love-ins, the more common description of a Roots Manuva gig is one of chaos.
Los Lobos' first of two sold-out nights at the House of Blues was far more informal than their annual love-ins at the 6,200-seat Greek, where their shows are almost always structured to satiate their wide range of fans who have picked up at some point on the band that graduated from East L.
While today's peace movement may not have the technocoloured vans, wild love-ins and frequent marches of the sixties, the message has not changed: we need to give peace a chance