loud

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Related to loudness: loudness unit, Loudness war
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loud mouth

1. A person who talks incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. That loud mouth Bill had better learn to stop discussing other peoples' business, or he's going to find himself with a lot of unwanted enemies. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth!
2. A tendency or habit of speaking in such a manner. That loud mouth of yours is going to get you in trouble one of these days. If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

be a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I had known you were such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

have a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he has such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: have, loud, mouth

scream loudest

To draw attention to a particular cause or problem, typically by overshadowing others. So we get to freeze in here while that department moves to a better office, just because they screamed loudest about the heat not working in this part of the building.
See also: loud, scream

think out loud

To verbalize one's thoughts, especially when trying to produce a solution or conclusion about something. Those weren't really suggestions for a solution, I was just thinking out loud. OK, so we've got 20 over there, 10 from the last one, five pending—sorry, I was thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out, think

loud-mouthed

Given to saying offensive or obnoxious things in a loud, forceful voice. Used before a noun. I don't know if I'll be able to sit through dinner with his loud-mouthed uncle again.

out loud

Audibly. Did you really just say that out loud? Please don't say everything you think.
See also: loud, out

for crying out loud

A expression of frustration or surprise. Mom, why are you calling this early? It's six in the morning, for crying out loud! Oh, for crying out loud—can't you just listen to what I have to say before you start arguing with me?
See also: crying, loud, out

loud and clear

A response to something that has been stated with intensity, intended to indicate that the listener understands the seriousness of the message. Essentially a shortening of "I hear you loud and clear." A: "If you come home after curfew one more time, you'll be grounded for the next two months—do you hear me?" B: "Loud and clear, Mom."
See also: and, clear, loud

loud enough to wake the dead

Extremely noisy and disruptive. Would you two be quiet—you're loud enough wake the dead! Having so many kids running around screaming all at once, it was loud enough to wake the dead!
See also: dead, enough, loud, wake

For crying out loud!

 and For crying in a bucket!
Inf. an exclamation of shock, anger, or surprise. Fred: For crying out loud! Answer the telephone! Bob: But it's always for you! John: Good grief! What am I going to do? This is the end! Sue: For crying in a bucket! What's wrong?
See also: crying, out

(I) read you loud and clear.

 
1. Lit. a response used by someone communicating by radio stating that the hearer understands the transmission clearly. (See also Do you read me?) Controller: This is Aurora Center, do you read me? Pilot: Yes, I read you loud and clear. Controller: Left two degrees. Do you read me? Pilot: Roger. Read you loud and clear.
2. Fig. I understand what you are telling me. (Used in general conversation, not in radio communication.) Bob: Okay. Now, do you understand exactly what I said? Mary: I read you loud and clear. Mother: I don't want to have to tell you again. Do you understand? Bill: I read you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud, read

(I'm) (just) thinking out loud.

Fig. I'm saying things that might better remain as private thoughts. (A way of characterizing or introducing one's opinions or thoughts. Also past tense.) Sue: What are you saying, anyway? Sounds like you're scolding someone. Bob: Oh, sorry. I was just thinking out loud. Bob: Now, this goes over here. Bill: You want me to move that? Bob: Oh, no. Just thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out, thinking

loud and clear

clear and distinctly. (Originally said of radio reception that is heard clearly and distinctly.) Tom: If I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times: Stop it! Do you hear me? Bill: Yes, loud and clear. I hear you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud

say something out loud

to say something so it can be heard; to say something that others might be thinking, but not saying. Yes, I said it, but I didn't mean to say it out loud. If you know the answer, please say it out loud.
See also: loud, out, say

think out loud

Fig. to say one's thoughts aloud. Excuse me. I didn't really mean to say that. I was just thinking out loud. Mr. Johnson didn't prepare a speech. He just stood there and thought out loud. It was a terrible presentation.
See also: loud, out, think

big mouth, have a

Also, have or be a loud mouth . Be loquacious, often noisily or boastfully; be tactless or reveal secrets. For example, After a few drinks, Dick turns into a loud mouth about his accomplishments, or Don't tell Peggy anything confidential; she's known for having a big mouth. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: big, have

for crying out loud

An exclamation of anger or exasperation, as in For crying out loud, can't you do anything right? This term is a euphemism for "for Christ's sake." [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: crying, loud, out

loud and clear

Easily audible and understandable. For example, They told us, loud and clear, what to do in an emergency, or You needn't repeat it-I hear you loud and clear. This expression gained currency in the military during World War II to acknowledge radio messages ( I read you loud and clear) although it originated in the late 1800s.
See also: and, clear, loud

out loud

Audibly, aloud, as in I sometimes find myself reading the paper out loud, or That movie was hilarious; the whole audience was laughing out loud. First recorded in 1821, this synonym for aloud was once criticized as too colloquial for formal writing, but this view is no longer widespread. Moreover, aloud is rarely used with verbs like laugh and cry. Also see for crying out loud.
See also: loud, out

to wake the dead, loud enough

Very loud, as in That band is loud enough to wake the dead. This hyperbolic expression dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: enough, loud, wake

loud and clear

COMMON If an idea, opinion, or message is loud and clear, it is expressed clearly and forcefully. The message must come across loud and clear from the manager: No matter how hard I ask you to work, I work as hard or harder. Our views and our voices are being heard loud and clear in the town hall. Note: You can also use loud and clear before a noun. The international community has sent a loud and clear message that all expressions of hatred and intolerance are unacceptable.
See also: and, clear, loud

for crying out loud

used to express your irritation or impatience. informal
1941 Rebecca West Black Lamb and Grey Falcon For crying out loud, why did you do it?
See also: crying, loud, out

for ˌcrying out ˈloud

(spoken, informal) used to express anger or frustration: For crying out loud! How many times have I asked you not to do that?
See also: crying, loud, out

ˌloud and ˈclear

(informal) said in a very clear voice or expressed very clearly: The message of the book is loud and clear: smoking kills.He let us know loud and clear that he would not accept students arriving late for his lectures.
See also: and, clear, loud

ˌout ˈloud

in a voice that can be heard by other people: I almost laughed out loud.Please read the letter out loud. OPPOSITE: under your breath
See also: loud, out

for crying out loud

Used to express annoyance or astonishment: Let's get going, for crying out loud!
See also: crying, loud, out
References in periodicals archive ?
Peter Poers, Managing Director of JE-nger Audio added: "We are delighted that Al Jazeera has chosen JE-nger Audio technology to regulate its audio content and control Loudness.
The specific loudness results for the cases with different levels of gear tooth wear are shown in Fig.
11) They found that the laser had no effect on reducing tinnitus loudness or the duration of episodes.
The decrease in tinnitus loudness was varied from 5 db to zero as shown in table VI.
We're pleased to be working closely with Dolby to integrate their loudness metering and measurement technologies into our media transformation solutions to help our customers meet regulatory and practical loudness requirements," he added By putting loudness solutions in the hands of its partners, Dolby is helping broadcasters comply with regulations such as the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act while providing a consistent, optimal audio experience.
Prochnik's willingness to travel upriver into the heart of loudness is commendable.
The topic of noise with tones, particularly in terms of how the addition of tones impacts perception of loudness or annoyance, has also generated much interest over the years, as aircraft, industrial machinery, and other office equipment can generate such spectra (Kryter and Pearsons 1965, Hellman 1982, 1984).
Those who had implants in both ears showed poorer control over the pitch and loudness of their voice than those with normal hearing.
hold that to understand speech or appreciate music, one has to process sequences of sounds (pitch has a peculiar importance for human listeners), and reassess the processing of pitch sequences and loudness sequences.
The new solution employs a predictive algorithm based on human perception of loudness to adjust the audio level when switching among DTV programs, movies, music and voice.
Word History: When a harpsichord is played, pressing on the keys causes the strings to be plucked in such a way that loudness and softness cannot be controlled.
The regulations say the "maximum subjective loudness" of advertisements must be consistent with the maximum loudness of programmes.
van Leeuwen argues that the semiotic resource of loudness, for example, realises perspective in sound; the semiotic resource of rhythm realises timing patterns in sound; the semiotic resource of pitch realises melody, and sound qualities are realised by all these semiotic resources as well as resources such as breathiness, or tension in sounds.
The Twilight Sad have the fierce loudness of a Mogwai house-party, while DeSalvo terrorise the audience.
Competing for loudness will be a tractor-pulling competition.