loud

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be a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I had known you were such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

for crying out loud

A expression of frustration or surprise. Mom, why are you calling this early? It's six in the morning, for crying out loud! Oh, for crying out loud—can't you just listen to what I have to say before you start arguing with me?
See also: crying, loud, out

have a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he has such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: have, loud, mouth

hear (one) loud and clear

1. To be clearly able to hear and understand what one is saying over the telephone or radio. Yes, ground control, I hear you loud and clear. We're hearing you loud and clear, Reggie. You can go ahead and bring your rig into the station.
2. To understand exactly what one means. I heard you loud and clear, Janet—first secure the deal, and then worry about the details. A: "Do you understand why this is so important?" B: "Yes, yes, I hear you loud and clear."
See also: and, clear, hear, loud

loud and clear

A response to something that has been stated with intensity, intended to indicate that the listener understands the seriousness of the message. Essentially a shortening of "I hear you loud and clear." A: "If you come home after curfew one more time, you'll be grounded for the next two months—do you hear me?" B: "Loud and clear, Mom."
See also: and, clear, loud

loud enough to wake the dead

Extremely noisy and disruptive. Would you two be quiet—you're loud enough wake the dead! Having so many kids running around screaming all at once was loud enough to wake the dead.
See also: dead, enough, loud, wake

loud mouth

1. A person who talks incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. That loud mouth Bill had better learn to stop discussing other peoples' business, or he's going to find himself with a lot of unwanted enemies. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth!
2. A tendency or habit of speaking in such a manner. That loud mouth of yours is going to get you in trouble one of these days. If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

loud-mouthed

Given to saying offensive or obnoxious things in a loud, forceful voice. Used before a noun. I don't know if I'll be able to sit through dinner with his loud-mouthed uncle again.

out loud

Audibly. Did you really just say that out loud? Please don't say everything you think.
See also: loud, out

read (one) loud and clear

1. To be clearly able to hear and understand what one is saying over the telephone or radio. Yes, ground control, I read you loud and clear. We're reading you loud and clear, Reggie. You can go ahead and bring your rig into the station.
2. To understand exactly what one means. I read you loud and clear, Janet—first secure the deal, and then worry about the details. A: "Do you understand why this is so important?" B: "Yes, yes, I read you loud and clear."
See also: and, clear, loud, read

say (something) out loud

To verbalize something so that others can hear it. If anyone has a suggestion, be sure to say it out loud! Oops, did I say that out loud? I meant to keep that thought to myself.
See also: loud, out, say

scream loudest

To draw attention to a particular cause or problem, typically by overshadowing others. So we get to freeze in here while that department moves to a better office, just because they screamed loudest about the heat not working in this part of the building.
See also: loud, scream

think out loud

To verbalize one's thoughts, especially when trying to produce a solution or conclusion about something. Those weren't really suggestions for a solution, I was just thinking out loud. OK, so we've got 20 over there, 10 from the last one, five pending—sorry, I was thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out, think

For crying out loud!

 and For crying in a bucket!
Inf. an exclamation of shock, anger, or surprise. Fred: For crying out loud! Answer the telephone! Bob: But it's always for you! John: Good grief! What am I going to do? This is the end! Sue: For crying in a bucket! What's wrong?
See also: crying, out

(I) read you loud and clear.

 
1. Lit. a response used by someone communicating by radio stating that the hearer understands the transmission clearly. (See also Do you read me?) Controller: This is Aurora Center, do you read me? Pilot: Yes, I read you loud and clear. Controller: Left two degrees. Do you read me? Pilot: Roger. Read you loud and clear.
2. Fig. I understand what you are telling me. (Used in general conversation, not in radio communication.) Bob: Okay. Now, do you understand exactly what I said? Mary: I read you loud and clear. Mother: I don't want to have to tell you again. Do you understand? Bill: I read you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud, read

(I'm) (just) thinking out loud.

Fig. I'm saying things that might better remain as private thoughts. (A way of characterizing or introducing one's opinions or thoughts. Also past tense.) Sue: What are you saying, anyway? Sounds like you're scolding someone. Bob: Oh, sorry. I was just thinking out loud. Bob: Now, this goes over here. Bill: You want me to move that? Bob: Oh, no. Just thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out, thinking

loud and clear

clear and distinctly. (Originally said of radio reception that is heard clearly and distinctly.) Tom: If I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times: Stop it! Do you hear me? Bill: Yes, loud and clear. I hear you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud

say something out loud

to say something so it can be heard; to say something that others might be thinking, but not saying. Yes, I said it, but I didn't mean to say it out loud. If you know the answer, please say it out loud.
See also: loud, out, say

think out loud

Fig. to say one's thoughts aloud. Excuse me. I didn't really mean to say that. I was just thinking out loud. Mr. Johnson didn't prepare a speech. He just stood there and thought out loud. It was a terrible presentation.
See also: loud, out, think

big mouth, have a

Also, have or be a loud mouth . Be loquacious, often noisily or boastfully; be tactless or reveal secrets. For example, After a few drinks, Dick turns into a loud mouth about his accomplishments, or Don't tell Peggy anything confidential; she's known for having a big mouth. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: big, have

for crying out loud

An exclamation of anger or exasperation, as in For crying out loud, can't you do anything right? This term is a euphemism for "for Christ's sake." [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: crying, loud, out

loud and clear

Easily audible and understandable. For example, They told us, loud and clear, what to do in an emergency, or You needn't repeat it-I hear you loud and clear. This expression gained currency in the military during World War II to acknowledge radio messages ( I read you loud and clear) although it originated in the late 1800s.
See also: and, clear, loud

out loud

Audibly, aloud, as in I sometimes find myself reading the paper out loud, or That movie was hilarious; the whole audience was laughing out loud. First recorded in 1821, this synonym for aloud was once criticized as too colloquial for formal writing, but this view is no longer widespread. Moreover, aloud is rarely used with verbs like laugh and cry. Also see for crying out loud.
See also: loud, out

to wake the dead, loud enough

Very loud, as in That band is loud enough to wake the dead. This hyperbolic expression dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: enough, loud, wake

loud and clear

COMMON If an idea, opinion, or message is loud and clear, it is expressed clearly and forcefully. The message must come across loud and clear from the manager: No matter how hard I ask you to work, I work as hard or harder. Our views and our voices are being heard loud and clear in the town hall. Note: You can also use loud and clear before a noun. The international community has sent a loud and clear message that all expressions of hatred and intolerance are unacceptable.
See also: and, clear, loud

for crying out loud

used to express your irritation or impatience. informal
1941 Rebecca West Black Lamb and Grey Falcon For crying out loud, why did you do it?
See also: crying, loud, out

for ˌcrying out ˈloud

(spoken, informal) used to express anger or frustration: For crying out loud! How many times have I asked you not to do that?
See also: crying, loud, out

ˌloud and ˈclear

(informal) said in a very clear voice or expressed very clearly: The message of the book is loud and clear: smoking kills.He let us know loud and clear that he would not accept students arriving late for his lectures.
See also: and, clear, loud

ˌout ˈloud

in a voice that can be heard by other people: I almost laughed out loud.Please read the letter out loud. OPPOSITE: under your breath
See also: loud, out

for crying out loud

Used to express annoyance or astonishment: Let's get going, for crying out loud!
See also: crying, loud, out

for crying out loud

An exclamation of anger or frustration. This euphemism for “for Christ’s sake” is of American origin and dates back to about 1900. One writer suggests it was coined by the cartoonist Thomas Aloysius Dorgan (1877–1929), who signed his work as TAD and is credited with inventing the name “hot dog.”
See also: crying, loud, out

loud and clear

Plainly audible and understandable; emphatically. This expression was widely used in the armed forces during World War II to acknowledge radio messages. It often was a response to “How do you read me?” the answer being “I read you loud and clear.” The same pairing, however, was made by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking Glass (1872), in which Humpty Dumpty recites to Alice, “I said it very loud and clear; I went and shouted in his ear. But he was very stiff and proud; He said, You needn’t shout so loud.” This meaning persists in the cliché—that is, I understand you perfectly well, and you need not repeat that over and over.
See also: and, clear, loud
References in periodicals archive ?
Hairdresser William Hillan drove neighbours to distraction by playing Tammy Wynette's Stand By Your Man at all hours and so loudly they couldn't hear their TVs.
"We recently found that children who snored loudly at both ages two and three years had more symptoms of hyperactivity, inattention, aggression, and even depression at age three than those who snored at only one age (but not both) and those who rarely snored.
Cobban, of Tweedsmuir Road, Perth, admitted breaching her ASBO by playing music excessively loudly on March 19 of this year.
It trotted around the shop before neighing loudly and then leaving of its own accord.
It had managed to get in through the main entrance and startled shoppers by neighing loudly before leaving of its own accord.
And the GREAT AMEN would have meaning--indeed it would be the moment when the people in whose name the priest has spoken (he uses WE 22 times in the first Eucharistic prayer) now proclaim loudly their approval of what he has said and done in their name.
"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good people to do nothing." Frankly, we haven't been protesting loudly or often enough.
Residents of Hartford, Connecticut, use a noise ordinance to bust an ice cream man charged with playing "Turkey in the Straw" too loudly and too late at night.
Between Lovers follows the path of the creative storyteller's previous books and loudly discusses the trials and tribulations of relationships between men and women.
Six floor-level sensors detect visitors' movements and trigger the pistons, forcing the bars to crash loudly against the flint-aggregate walls.
Workers who gossip, talk loudly, only make coffee for themselves and always look depressed are causing their office colleagues undue stress, a new report showed today.
Beckham rolls next, ripping and sticking loudly. Simultaneously, computerized video of a dancing silver cyborg figure is projected on and above the performers.
When she questioned him, Stanton "became very rude and began talking very loudly," Davis testified.
The father-in-law said the defendant insulted and cursed him loudly and said bad words about his wife, daughter and him.
Two gangs of women at the auditorium clashed so loudly that it drowned out the ending of the S&M blockbuster.