loud


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loud mouth

1. A person who talks incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. That loud mouth Bill had better learn to stop discussing other peoples' business, or he's going to find himself with a lot of unwanted enemies. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth!
2. A tendency or habit of speaking in such a manner. That loud mouth of yours is going to get you in trouble one of these days. If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

be a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he's such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I had known you were such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: loud, mouth

have a loud mouth

To have a tendency or habit of speaking incessantly, indiscreetly, and/or in a noisy, boastful manner. I can't stand Terry's new husband—he has such a loud mouth when he drinks! If I'd known you had such a loud mouth, I'd have never shared my secret with you!
See also: have, loud, mouth

scream loudest

To draw attention to a particular cause or problem, typically by overshadowing others. So we get to freeze in here while that department moves to a better office, just because they screamed loudest about the heat not working in this part of the building.
See also: loud, scream

think out loud

To verbalize one's thoughts, especially when trying to produce a solution or conclusion about something. Those weren't really suggestions for a solution, I was just thinking out loud. OK, so we've got 20 over there, 10 from the last one, five pending—sorry, I was thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out, think

loud-mouthed

Given to saying offensive or obnoxious things in a loud, forceful voice. (Used before a noun.) I don't know if I'll be able to sit through dinner with his loud-mouthed uncle again.

out loud

Audibly. Those weren't really suggestions for a solution, I was just thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out

for crying out loud

A expression of frustration or surprise. Mom, why are you calling this early? It's six in the morning, for crying out loud! Oh, for crying out loud—can't you just listen to what I have to say before you start arguing with me?
See also: crying, loud, out

For crying out loud!

 and For crying in a bucket!
Inf. an exclamation of shock, anger, or surprise. Fred: For crying out loud! Answer the telephone! Bob: But it's always for you! John: Good grief! What am I going to do? This is the end! Sue: For crying in a bucket! What's wrong?
See also: crying, out

(I) read you loud and clear.

 
1. Lit. a response used by someone communicating by radio stating that the hearer understands the transmission clearly. (See also Do you read me?) Controller: This is Aurora Center, do you read me? Pilot: Yes, I read you loud and clear. Controller: Left two degrees. Do you read me? Pilot: Roger. Read you loud and clear.
2. Fig. I understand what you are telling me. (Used in general conversation, not in radio communication.) Bob: Okay. Now, do you understand exactly what I said? Mary: I read you loud and clear. Mother: I don't want to have to tell you again. Do you understand? Bill: I read you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud, read

(I'm) (just) thinking out loud.

Fig. I'm saying things that might better remain as private thoughts. (A way of characterizing or introducing one's opinions or thoughts. Also past tense.) Sue: What are you saying, anyway? Sounds like you're scolding someone. Bob: Oh, sorry. I was just thinking out loud. Bob: Now, this goes over here. Bill: You want me to move that? Bob: Oh, no. Just thinking out loud.
See also: loud, out, thinking

loud and clear

clear and distinctly. (Originally said of radio reception that is heard clearly and distinctly.) Tom: If I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times: Stop it! Do you hear me? Bill: Yes, loud and clear. I hear you loud and clear.
See also: and, clear, loud

say something out loud

to say something so it can be heard; to say something that others might be thinking, but not saying. Yes, I said it, but I didn't mean to say it out loud. If you know the answer, please say it out loud.
See also: loud, out, say

think out loud

Fig. to say one's thoughts aloud. Excuse me. I didn't really mean to say that. I was just thinking out loud. Mr. Johnson didn't prepare a speech. He just stood there and thought out loud. It was a terrible presentation.
See also: loud, out, think

big mouth, have a

Also, have or be a loud mouth . Be loquacious, often noisily or boastfully; be tactless or reveal secrets. For example, After a few drinks, Dick turns into a loud mouth about his accomplishments, or Don't tell Peggy anything confidential; she's known for having a big mouth. [Slang; late 1800s]
See also: big, have

for crying out loud

An exclamation of anger or exasperation, as in For crying out loud, can't you do anything right? This term is a euphemism for "for Christ's sake." [Colloquial; early 1900s]
See also: crying, loud, out

loud and clear

Easily audible and understandable. For example, They told us, loud and clear, what to do in an emergency, or You needn't repeat it-I hear you loud and clear. This expression gained currency in the military during World War II to acknowledge radio messages ( I read you loud and clear) although it originated in the late 1800s.
See also: and, clear, loud

out loud

Audibly, aloud, as in I sometimes find myself reading the paper out loud, or That movie was hilarious; the whole audience was laughing out loud. First recorded in 1821, this synonym for aloud was once criticized as too colloquial for formal writing, but this view is no longer widespread. Moreover, aloud is rarely used with verbs like laugh and cry. Also see for crying out loud.
See also: loud, out

to wake the dead, loud enough

Very loud, as in That band is loud enough to wake the dead. This hyperbolic expression dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: enough, loud, wake

loud and clear

COMMON If an idea, opinion, or message is loud and clear, it is expressed clearly and forcefully. The message must come across loud and clear from the manager: No matter how hard I ask you to work, I work as hard or harder. Our views and our voices are being heard loud and clear in the town hall. Note: You can also use loud and clear before a noun. The international community has sent a loud and clear message that all expressions of hatred and intolerance are unacceptable.
See also: and, clear, loud

for crying out loud

used to express your irritation or impatience. informal
1941 Rebecca West Black Lamb and Grey Falcon For crying out loud, why did you do it?
See also: crying, loud, out

for ˌcrying out ˈloud

(spoken, informal) used to express anger or frustration: For crying out loud! How many times have I asked you not to do that?
See also: crying, loud, out

ˌloud and ˈclear

(informal) said in a very clear voice or expressed very clearly: The message of the book is loud and clear: smoking kills.He let us know loud and clear that he would not accept students arriving late for his lectures.
See also: and, clear, loud

ˌout ˈloud

in a voice that can be heard by other people: I almost laughed out loud.Please read the letter out loud. OPPOSITE: under your breath
See also: loud, out

for crying out loud

Used to express annoyance or astonishment: Let's get going, for crying out loud!
See also: crying, loud, out
References in periodicals archive ?
At least two people had been arrested for breaching the loud speaker act, whereas bridegroom and his friend fled from the scene.
He's always been loud - sometimes too loud, irritatingly loud
Wakim Zeidan, founding member of Nuqat commented on this collaboration, "This is the first collaboration that Nuqat does in Saudi Arabia and with a promising Saudi initiative such as Loud Art.
Not loud enough to make anything shake but it does sound like Independence Day
She said: "It was not that loud, it was just a loud hi-fi.
Spokesman Paul Rideout said: "Kids love to play their music loud on their new iPods and phones, but people have a right to travel in peace and quiet.
Jesse: Ok, the Loud Pipes save the lives of all the kiddies we play for all over the US.
DRIVERS who listen to loud, fast music are twice as likely to have an accident, according to new research.
Just weeks before his death on December 21, writer Lance Loud called Alan and Susan Raymond from the Carl Bean hospice in Los Angeles and asked them to film what he knew would be his final days.
LANCASTER - Two toy fire engines, a Barney music keyboard, a Sesame Street talking CD player and a toy gun are among seven toys that are dangerously loud and could pose a hearing hazard to young children, a consumer group said Tuesday.
Unlike some similar yellow and orange earplugs that are made for factory compliance purposes, Safe Sound Foam Earplugs are colored in fashionable teal for use around the house, at loud concerts, or in the workshop for sleep, study, work, travel, sports, shooting, power tools, loud events, etc.
Their own agenda is simple: If the music is too loud, turn it down
That's about as loud as an ambulance siren, at a pitch comparable to the lowest notes on a cello.
PINK SHEETS: PDVP) is pleased to announce the appointment of Robert Loud as the new President of the Company.
Ironically, the expulsion from Google came just days after Loud Cannabis received an award for "Best New Marijuana App" from CannaNews.