lose trace of (someone or something)

(redirected from lost trace)

lose trace of (someone or something)

1. To lose visibility of, forget about, misplace, or neglect to pay close attention to someone or something. I'm sorry I'm late—we were having so much fun that I completely lost trace of time. I was watching the bird through my binoculars until I lost trace of it in the canopy. The police lost trace of the criminal somewhere in the swamp.
2. To unintentionally decrease frequency of communication with someone over time until no further contact takes place. Unfortunately, I lost trace of my college roommate, so I have no idea how she's doing now. Yeah, I lost trace of Mark after he moved to Thailand.
See also: lose, of, trace

lose trace of someone or something

Rur. to fail to maintain a way of finding someone or something. I lost trace of Walter after we left high school. I lost trace of the stock certificates after about twenty years.
See also: lose, of, trace
References in classic literature ?
The unexpected recovery of the lost trace of Miss Silvester--there is no disguising it--seriously annoyed him.
My idea was to "sound" immediately under the rocks, on the chance of recovering the lost trace of the chain at the point at which it entered the sand.
We came to the end of the stage, and still the lost trace was not recovered.
If, however, we choose to suppose that any of the descendants of A or of I have been so much modified as to have more or less completely lost traces of their parentage, in this case, their places in a natural classification will have been more or less completely lost,--as sometimes seems to have occurred with existing organisms.
Potassium supplements and general vitamin supplements are recommended to cover any lost trace minerals.
With regard to the missing persons, I should say that those who have lost trace of their kith and kin deserve all sympathy.
But again, due to blind spots in the CCTV, officers lost trace of Kelvin once again.
It has since been recovered, but many countries, particularly France, have lost trace of many works of arts.
He said he had been admitted to a psychiatric hospital in 1985 but doctors later lost trace of him.
He said he had been admitted to a psychiatric hospital in 1985, but doctors later lost trace of him.
It was never played for again but Hallam, the world's second oldest club, lost trace of it.
The first exhibition, Director's Cut, recaptures lost traces of Birmingham's cinema heritage.
During the prelude of Das Rheingold, everyday people walked quickly in an endless human flow along the Rhein, throwing scraps into the current, a metaphor for the lost traces of existence.
Gillian Beer shrewdly observes (in a passage quoted in this volume's introduction) that since "we cannot know extensively who tuned into whom or how hard they listened," we must only imagine the lost traces of the influence a broadcaster might have had on a fellow writer or artist (14).
As the urban center grew it never lost traces of this history.