lose reason

(redirected from lost his reason)

lose reason

To become insensible; to lose the ability to think rationally or logically; to be unable to reason. A possessive pronoun can be used between "lose" and "reason." My brain was so addled with drugs that I completely lost reason. What is going on with the boss's decisions lately? It's like she's lost her reason.
See also: lose, reason

lose one's reason

Fig. to lose one's power of reasoning, possibly in anger. I was so confused that I almost lost my reason. Bob seems to have lost his reason when he struck John.
See also: lose, reason
References in classic literature ?
A sea- captain, who had assisted Phips in the enterprise, utterly lost his reason at the sight of it.
The War Office said he had lost his reason through shell shock.
Once he was made redundant he felt he had lost his reason.'
This allows for a reinterpretation of later poems such as 'Andenken' and 'Vom Abgrund nemlich ...', in which Holderlin registers the busy life of sailors and port workers speaking Gascon dialect (for example, the word 'Killalusimeno' translates as 'he has lost his reason', from Bordeaux street dialect 'Qu'il a lous y meno').
Unfortunately, all his materials were lost in the port of Buenos Aires when he set sail for Europe; humanity lost much extremely useful information, but Joseph de Jussieu lost his reason, as he never recovered from this calamity.
"With this act, Perez Balladares seems to have lost his reason, or he is immersed in a crisis of depression about all the negatives things he has done during his administration," Pariente said.
In 1633, the probable period of the play's composition, the long-suffering Sir Archibald seems to have lost his reason, while she herself was being particularly vociferous against the court(12) and openly denigrating Ford's early dedicatee, the Earl of Arundel.(13) Her obsessive habit of punning on the various versions of her own name and those of her relations in her prophecies, coupled with her growing notoriety in the early 1630s, would have made the connection between the name of "Audley" in the play, and the real-life woman who claimed to be married to the mad royal heir, inescapable.