lose favor (with one)

(redirected from lost favor)

lose favor (with one)

To no longer be supported, accepted, approved of, or regarded highly by one. John lost favor with his boss ever since he managed to drive away the firm's most lucrative client. Those stupid toys are just a fad—they'll start losing favor sooner or later.
See also: favor, lose
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lose favor

(with someone) Go to fall out of favor (with someone).
See also: favor, lose
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He said the fake degree narrative was being bandied pushed by some malicious people who lost favor with the university management.
Following Charles' separation from Diana, the Prince of Wales became less popular in the press and according to "Rebel Prince: The Power, Passion and Defiance of Prince Charles" by Tom Bower, he also lost favor with members of the royal family.
I asked the former senator if the candidacy of Go was a case of being kicked upstairs, meaning he's lost favor, as some have suggested, or whether it has the full backing of the President.
In contrast, after the financial crisis, big banks with tarnished reputations lost favor as employers of choice for MBA graduates.
The scope of their stoic prowess seems to be a revival of Barelvi politics that had lost favor over the years.
Those who were dreaming to break PML-N lost favor of their own MPAs' in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.
Ma is stepping down as president next year after his maximum two terms, during which the ruling Nationalist Party has lost favor over its pro-China policies.
Condos lost favor and apartment rents rose during much of the recession and its aftermath.
In recent years, there has been the perception that Ahmed Dogan and the Movement have lost favor with authorities in Turkey.
While Washington's approval increased by double digits in Britain and Belgium in 2011, it lost favor on other fronts, including double-digit declines in France, Germany, Spain and Sweden.
Because of this, the RLR concept lost favor with passage of the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, which imposed the following restrictions on RLR plans:
But higher-resolution images from later spacecraft revealed little more, and the idea lost favor.
But he lost favor after Assad took power following the death of his father, Hafez, in 2000.