lose touch


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Related to lose touch: lose touch with reality, lost touch

lose touch

1. To no longer communicate with someone regularly. In this usage, "lose touch" is a set phrase. Unfortunately, my college roommate and I lost touch over the years, so I have no idea how she's doing now.
2. To no longer be skilled in doing something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "lose" and "touch." The students no longer listen to my threats—I must be losing my touch.
See also: lose, touch

lose one's touch (with someone or something)

Fig. to lose one's ability to handle someone or something. I seem to have lost my touch with my children. They won't listen to me anymore. We've both lost our touch as far as managing people goes.
See also: lose, touch

lose one's touch

No longer be able to do or handle something skillfully. For example, I used to make beautiful cakes but I seem to have lost my touch, or Dad had a real knack for letting someone down gently, but he's lost his touch. This expression alludes to the older sense of touch as a musician's skill on an instrument or an artist's skill in using a brush or chisel. [First half of 1900s] Also see lose touch.
See also: lose, touch

lose touch

Fail to keep in contact or communication, as in The two sisters lost touch years ago, or Please don't lose touch with me after you move away. [Late 1800s] For an antonym, see in touch.
See also: lose, touch

lose your touch

If you lose your touch, you become less skillful at doing something. Despite thirteen years in the job, she has not lost her touch.
See also: lose, touch

lose your touch

not show your customary skill.
1991 Times The guv'nor is a former pork butcher who has clearly not lost his touch.
See also: lose, touch

lose ˈtouch/ˈcontact (with somebody/something)

not write/speak to somebody or not hear/read about somebody/something as you did in the past: She lost touch with most of her old friends when she moved to London.
See also: contact, lose, touch

lose your ˈtouch

lose the skill or ability to do something which you used to do very well: I don’t know what’s happened to her playing. She seems to have lost her touch.He’s not as good a salesman as he used to be. He’s losing his touch.
See also: lose, touch
References in periodicals archive ?
The unbeaten Mancunian has seen other fighters changed by fame and lose touch with their roots but vows that it won't happen to him.
When you're away, you kind of lose touch with your mates in Civvy Street.
Norma's going to spend a few days in North Wales this week but we're determined not to lose touch again.
Once you leave active coaching, you lose touch with some of the players that are going to be there,'' he said.
They may tend to lose touch with the concerns of people and the message they are supposedly compelled to profess and instead ornament their increasingly valuable worldly property and extend their power and influence.
That way Labour would not lose touch with its electorate and would understand what people in the country were thinking.
With GoodContacts and our Web-based Address Book services, our goal is to make sure people never lose touch with their important relationships again.
MORE than 40 per cent of fathers lose touch with their children after a divorce.