lose it


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lose it

1. To lose control of one's emotions, especially by becoming angry or upset. Mom is going to lose it when she gets home and finds out that we broke her vase. When I saw that last scene, I just lost it. It was so sad!
2. To lose an ability, skill, or quality that one previously had. A: "I used to be so much better at the guitar, but I feel like I'm losing it." B: "Well, have you been practicing?" She used to turn heads wherever she went, but I think she's lost it a little as she's aged.
3. To vomit. I thought I was going to lose it out on that boat—I felt so seasick!
See also: lose

lose it

 
1. Sl. to empty one's stomach; to vomit. Oh, God! I think I'm going to lose it! Go lose it in the bushes.
2. Sl. to get angry; to lose one's temper. It was too much for him. Ted lost it. I sat there calmly, biting my lip to keep from losing it.
See also: lose

lose it

INFORMAL
COMMON
1. If someone loses it, they become extremely angry or upset. I completely lost it. I was shouting and swearing.
2. If someone loses it, they become unable to do something they are usually able to do. He walked on stage, looked out into the audience and just lost it. He forgot the words and started to make up completely different ones.
See also: lose

lose it

lose control of your temper or emotions. informal
2004 Independent I talk calmly, and then I lose it and start ranting angrily.
See also: lose

ˈlose it

(spoken) be unable to stop yourself from crying, laughing, etc.; become crazy: Then she just lost it completely and started screaming.
See also: lose

lose it

1. tv. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. (Collegiate.) Oh, God! I think I’m going to lose it!
2. tv. to get angry; to lose one’s temper; lose control. I sat there calmly, biting my lip to keep from losing it.
See also: lose

lose it

Slang
1. To become very angry or emotionally upset.
2. To become deranged or mentally disturbed.
3. To become less capable or proficient; decline: He can still play tennis well. He hasn't lost it yet.
See also: lose

lose it, to

To lose one’s temper or composure, to go berserk. Dating from the second half of the 1900s, this expression is rapidly becoming a cliché. The Washington Post (May 29, 1983) described it, “His eruptions at umpires are genuine furies. ‘When something goes against his grain . . . he just completely loses it.’”
See also: lose
References in periodicals archive ?
Every time we lose it's my fault and we work backwards from there.
Boss Neil Watt revealed the game shouldn't be in danger from the weather and said: "If we lose it's only four points between us and that shows how tight it can be
Suddenly the term 'heading to the sun for Christmas' has begun to lose it's appeal.
Coyle snapped: "When a big club lose it's because they have not played particularly well, but sometimes it is because they have not been allowed to play well.
"As long as I can turn up and play, if I lose it's no big deal.
He added: "The players have got to accept the challenge otherwise they can go and play non-league where if you lose it's no big deal.
"Every time you lose it's devastating because you've put in such an effort during the year.
"If we lose it's all over, while a draw will leave us needing a miracle!" declared Keely whose charges have not won in six attempts.
"But if they lose it's just an awful time and it ruins my entire day.
But if we lose it's hard to see how we'll avoid defeats against England at Twickenham and Italy at Murrayfield.