loop

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keep (someone) in the loop

To keep someone informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. We've hired a new intern to help you with data entry, so be sure to keep her in the loop about the project.
See also: keep, loop

be kept in the loop

To be kept informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. We've hired a new intern to help you with the data entry portion of the study, so be sure she's kept in the loop.
See also: kept, loop

be in the loop

To be informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. We've hired a new intern to help you with data entry, so she needs to be in the loop about the project too. Sam and I only broke up a few weeks ago, so I'm not in the market for a new girlfriend just yet.
See also: loop

in the loop

Fig. in the group of persons communicating regularly about a specific plan or project. I don't know what's going on with the Jones deal since I'm not in the loop. Bob and Jean are in the loop. They can tell you what's happening.
See also: loop

knock someone for a loop

 
1. Fig. to strike someone hard. You really knocked me for a loop. I hope that was an accident. DI was really knocked for a loop by the falling branch.
2. and throw someone for a loop Fig. to confuse or shock someone. (This is more severe and upsetting than throw someone a curve.) When Bill heard the news, it threw him for a loop. The manager knocked Bob for a loop by firing him on the spot.
See also: knock, loop

in the loop

Provided with information and included in a decision-making process. For example, She's new to the board, but be sure to keep her in the loop. This expression uses loop in the sense of "a circle of individuals among whom information or responsibility circulates." The antonym out of the loop, meaning "left out of such a circle," dates from the same period. For example, The chairman was consistently leaving Chris out of the loop. [1970s]
See also: loop

knock for a loop

Also, throw for a loop; knock down or over with a feather ; knock sideways. Overcome with surprise or astonishment, as in The news of his death knocked me for a loop, or Being fired without any warning threw me for a loop, or Jane was knocked sideways when she found out she won. The first two of these hyperbolic colloquial usages, dating from the first half of the 1900s, allude to the comic-strip image of a person pushed hard enough to roll over in the shape of a loop. The third hyperbolic term, often put as You could have knocked me down with a feather, intimating that something so light as a feather could knock one down, dates from the early 1800s; the fourth was first recorded in 1925.
See also: knock, loop

out of the loop

see under in the loop.
See also: loop, of, out

in the loop

COMMON If someone is in the loop, they are part of a group of people who have information about a particular thing. The vice president was almost certainly in the loop. In future we must ensure that the Congress is fully in the loop. Note: If someone is out of the loop, they do not make or know about important decisions. He is out of the inner loop, and not happy about it.
See also: loop

throw someone for a loop

or

knock someone for a loop

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If someone or something throws you for a loop or knocks you for a loop, they shock you or surprise you very much. If Kravis's offer had thrown him for a loop, Johnson wasn't letting it show. She was wearing a top hat, the sight of which knocked Jamie for a loop.
See also: loop, throw

fruitcake

1. n. a silly-acting person. (Also a term of address.) You can be such a silly fruitcake sometimes.
2. n. a male homosexual. (Rude and derogatory. An elaboration of fruit.) We went into this bar, but it was filled with fruitcakes, so we left.
3. and fruit loop n. a foolish oaf. (Someone who is as nutty as a fruitcake. Fruit loop is borrowed from the cereal of the same [protected trade] name.) What a fruitcake! Doesn’t even know where his head is at. Out of the way, fruit loop.

fruit loop

verb
See also: fruit, loop

loop-legged

mod. alcohol intoxicated. She has this strange tendency to get a little loop-legged when she has four or five drinks.

throw someone for a loop

tv. to confuse or surprise someone. Don’t let this question throw you for a loop.
See also: loop, throw

in the loop

Part of a group that is kept up-to-date with information about something: knew about the merger because she's in the loop.
See also: loop

out of the loop

Not part of a group that is kept up-to-date with information about something.
See also: loop, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
More than half of the principals (72%) stated that looping raised parental involvement in education, but only 46% of the teachers agreed with this statement.
The replies to the questions directed to principals revealed that most principals (89%) believed that looping decreases the number of disciplinary problems in schools.
When teachers were asked a similar question, 37% of them indicated that looping increases the chance of student-teacher personality conflict.
In addition to responding to the true/false questions, most principals (89%) and the majority of teachers (75%) provided comments about looping as it was implemented in their schools.
Several principals surveyed commented on the way teachers are selected to work with looping classes.
The majority of respondents in both groups stated that looping provided more time to slower students to learn basic skills.
Findings based on analyses of student academic performance, retention and absenteeism figures, and teacher and principal surveys indicate that looping has a beneficial educational effect on students, and that it is viewed positively by school personnel.
The results of the analyses of student academic achievement demonstrate that students in the Looping Sample, as a group, exhibited significantly higher academic performance on the reading comprehension and mathematics applications sections of the FCAT than did students in the Matching Sample.
The result of the analysis of student's absenteeism figures shows that students in the Looping Sample, as a group, improved their attendance between the first and second years of the loop.
The results of the student retention figures demonstrated that the number of students in the Looping Sample retained after the 1999-2000 school year was significantly lower than the corresponding figure for the Matching Sample.
The majority of respondents agreed that looping enhanced a working relationship between teachers and their students.