loop


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keep (someone) in the loop

To keep someone informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. We've hired a new intern to help you with data entry, so be sure to keep her in the loop about the project.
See also: keep, loop

be kept in the loop

To be kept informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. We've hired a new intern to help you with the data entry portion of the study, so be sure she's kept in the loop.
See also: kept, loop

be in the loop

To be informed about and/or involved in something, such as a plan or project, especially that which involves or pertains to a specific group. We've hired a new intern to help you with data entry, so she needs to be in the loop about the project too.
See also: loop

in the loop

Informed and/or actively participating in something, such as an ongoing discussion or project, typically involving many people. Please keep Sarah in the loop so she can continue to advise us on the legal ramifications. I'm afraid I haven't been in the loop on this project. Can you bring me up to speed?
See also: loop

knock (one) for a loop

1. To impact one with physical force, either intentionally or unintentionally, resulting in pain, disorientation, etc. He wasn't going very fast at all, but it still knocked me for a loop when the cyclist ran into me.
2. To shock, surprise, astonish, or bewilder one. The end of that trick always knocks the audience for a loop. I love watching their faces as they desperately try to figure it out. It really knocked Stu for a loop when Olivia announced she was leaving the company.
See also: knock, loop

throw (one) for a loop

1. To impact one with physical force, either intentionally or unintentionally, resulting in pain, disorientation, etc. He wasn't going very fast at all, but it still threw me for a loop when the cyclist ran into me.
2. To shock, surprise, astonish, or bewilder one. The end of that trick always throws the audience for a loop. I love watching their faces as they desperately try to figure it out. It really threw Stu for a loop when Olivia announced she was leaving the company.
See also: loop, throw

out of the loop

Not privy to the most up-to-date information. I'm sorry, what is this we're discussing? I'm a little out of the loop. They tried to keep the boss out of the loop about their scheme, but she found out about it anyway.
See also: loop, of, out

loop the loop

1. noun A flight maneuver in which an aircraft flies in a complete vertical circle. (Usually hyphenated.) I loved going to airshows as a kid, and I always dreamed of doing loop-the-loops in an airplane when I grew up.
2. verb To fly an aircraft in a complete vertical circle. I thought I was going to throw up when the pilot looped the loop with our little biplane.
See also: loop

in the loop

Fig. in the group of persons communicating regularly about a specific plan or project. I don't know what's going on with the Jones deal since I'm not in the loop. Bob and Jean are in the loop. They can tell you what's happening.
See also: loop

knock someone for a loop

 
1. Fig. to strike someone hard. You really knocked me for a loop. I hope that was an accident. DI was really knocked for a loop by the falling branch.
2. and throw someone for a loop Fig. to confuse or shock someone. (This is more severe and upsetting than throw someone a curve.) When Bill heard the news, it threw him for a loop. The manager knocked Bob for a loop by firing him on the spot.
See also: knock, loop

in the loop

Provided with information and included in a decision-making process. For example, She's new to the board, but be sure to keep her in the loop. This expression uses loop in the sense of "a circle of individuals among whom information or responsibility circulates." The antonym out of the loop, meaning "left out of such a circle," dates from the same period. For example, The chairman was consistently leaving Chris out of the loop. [1970s]
See also: loop

knock for a loop

Also, throw for a loop; knock down or over with a feather ; knock sideways. Overcome with surprise or astonishment, as in The news of his death knocked me for a loop, or Being fired without any warning threw me for a loop, or Jane was knocked sideways when she found out she won. The first two of these hyperbolic colloquial usages, dating from the first half of the 1900s, allude to the comic-strip image of a person pushed hard enough to roll over in the shape of a loop. The third hyperbolic term, often put as You could have knocked me down with a feather, intimating that something so light as a feather could knock one down, dates from the early 1800s; the fourth was first recorded in 1925.
See also: knock, loop

out of the loop

see under in the loop.
See also: loop, of, out

in the loop

COMMON If someone is in the loop, they are part of a group of people who have information about a particular thing. The vice president was almost certainly in the loop. In future we must ensure that the Congress is fully in the loop. Note: If someone is out of the loop, they do not make or know about important decisions. He is out of the inner loop, and not happy about it.
See also: loop

throw someone for a loop

or

knock someone for a loop

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If someone or something throws you for a loop or knocks you for a loop, they shock you or surprise you very much. If Kravis's offer had thrown him for a loop, Johnson wasn't letting it show. She was wearing a top hat, the sight of which knocked Jamie for a loop.
See also: loop, someone, throw

in (or out of) the loop

aware (or unaware) of information known to only a limited number of people. informal
1998 Times An insider suggests to a favoured, helpful journalist that the said minister is out of the loop and on the skids.
See also: loop

throw (or knock) someone for a loop

surprise or astonish someone; catch someone off guard. North American
See also: loop, someone, throw

be in the ˈloop

,

be out of the ˈloop

(informal, especially American English) be part of a group of people that is dealing with something important; not be part of this group: A lot of people want to be in the loop on this operation.Lawton had gradually been cut out of the information loop.
See also: loop

knock/throw somebody for a ˈloop

(American English, informal) shock or surprise somebody: The result of the election knocked most people for a loop.
See also: knock, loop, somebody, throw

ˌloop the ˈloop

fly or make a plane fly in a circle going up and down: The plane looped the loop then disappeared into the distance.
See also: loop

fruitcake

1. n. a silly-acting person. (Also a term of address.) You can be such a silly fruitcake sometimes.
2. n. a male homosexual. (Rude and derogatory. An elaboration of fruit.) We went into this bar, but it was filled with fruitcakes, so we left.
3. and fruit loop n. a foolish oaf. (Someone who is as nutty as a fruitcake. Fruit loop is borrowed from the cereal of the same [protected trade] name.) What a fruitcake! Doesn’t even know where his head is at. Out of the way, fruit loop.

fruit loop

verb
See also: fruit, loop

loop-legged

mod. alcohol intoxicated. She has this strange tendency to get a little loop-legged when she has four or five drinks.

throw someone for a loop

tv. to confuse or surprise someone. Don’t let this question throw you for a loop.
See also: loop, someone, throw

in the loop

Part of a group that is kept up-to-date with information about something: knew about the merger because she's in the loop.
See also: loop

out of the loop

Not part of a group that is kept up-to-date with information about something.
See also: loop, of, out
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, the loops on the front and back needles need to be set up in the same way as the loops above and below the highlighted row in illustration C from our discussion of knitting structure, with a half loop at each end of the back needle stitches (K).
Tie a Bimini twist and then a double surgeon's loop in your tippet.
Because motorcycle and bicycle hubs are vertical metal circles, when a bicycle or motorcycle travels over a loop wire, eddy currents are induced in the conducting wheel rims and frame.
A loop (quasigroup) is an automorphic inverse property loop (quasigroup) [AIPL (AIPQ) ] if and only if it obeys the identity
4 Continue making loops by pulling the cord through each newly created loop.
For single node connections, traditional loop is adequate.
Of the 26 schools, 11 were in the first year of the loop or had only gifted or Advanced Academic Placement program students participating in looping.
A loop is excited by an electronic signal ranging in frequency from 10 kilohertz to 200 kilohertz, which creates an electromagnetic field.
Yet they might have been more clearly fleshed out had there been some additional inclusions: Stan Douglas's Der Sandmann, Tacita Dean's Green Ray, and Thomas Demand's Rolltreppe (Escalator) come to mind, as does Graham's Verwandlungs-musik, which deals explicitly with the loop.
For most closed-loop feedback control systems, phase margin is greater than 45[degrees] (less than 315[degrees]) when the loop gain is greater than 0 dB.
The closed loop voltage gain of the operational amplifier can be defined in terms of the open loop voltage gain as:
Extend the traditional out-and-back hike to a loop by taking the short extension west of the fall that passes a placard flagging the site of John Muir's first Yosemite Valley cabin.
Like King Zulu, each of Reed's protagonists - from Bukka Doopeyduk and the Loop Garoo Kid in his first two novels, The Free-Lance Pallbearers (1967) and Yellow Back Radio Broke-Down (1969), to PaPa LaBas in Mumbo Jumbo (1972) and The Last Days of Louisiana Red (1974), Raven Quickskill in Flight to Canada (1976), and Black Peter in The Terrible Twos (1982) - assumes the trickster's role.
While the channel furnace was invented in 1890, it wasn't until 1917 that James Wyatt developed a workable single loop inductor.
It is a common misunderstanding that increasing the distance between coil feed and straightener (a longer loop in the horizontal dimension) will provide a larger amount of slack material in the loop.