look askance at (someone or something)

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look askance at (someone or something)

To view or regard something in a disapproving or distrustful manner. I can't understand why everyone in this club is looking askance at me. Am I not wearing the right thing? Some people look askance at these institutions, but I believe they are beneficial to the public.
See also: askance, look

look askance at someone or something

Fig. to be surprised or shocked at someone or something. The teacher looked askance at the student who had acted so rudely. Everyone had looked askance at her efforts as an artist.
See also: askance, look
References in classic literature ?
He looks askance at the lady who waits in the shop, and ties up the cards again in their envelope of whitey-brown paper, and hands them to the poor widow and Miss Clapp, who had never seen such beautiful things in her life, and had been quite confident that the man must give at least two guineas for the screens.
Pakistan's close ties with the Kingdom are looked upon with suspicion by Tehran, although it is not in the former's own interest to be involved in a shooting war based on a personalised, sectarian misadventure, while Pakistan looks askance at Iran's deepening ties with existential threat India, and recent leasing of Chahbahar to the Indians, though it is being assured that the port would not be used against Pakistan.
Naturally, things don't always go to plan - the original budgets and deadlines become specks in the distance, the owners struggle to cope with the stress, much-needed materials don't turn up, and McCloud occasionally looks askance at their plans.
Or, at the very least, we isolate ourselves and quake in our boots whenever another world power looks askance at us.
50pm Carry on courting: Alan Bennett looks askance at the faffing and flummery of life in Windsor Castle as various quacks try to reacquaint George III with reason in the 1780s.
It seeks to dispel the whispered rumors that Judaism looks askance at those of other faiths who seek or have adopted a Jewish way of life.
The world body looks askance at the Second Amendment to the Constitution that guarantees to every American the right to keep and bear arms.
Merson looks askance at such characters, believing that players should go into the game for the love of it, not to make their money then make a hasty exit.
Barrow is an Anglicised stickler for procedure who has spent the war in a Japanese POW camp, and looks askance at the wartime laxities which continue on Sinclair's watch.
It also looks askance at the fees EU operators are obliged to pay to fly over Russia.
When he does discuss free-market rhetoric, Aune looks askance at its "realist" style, which implies that the speaker has seen through "the pretensions of poets, dreamers, and romantics" and understands the way the world really works.
Anyone who so much as looks askance at a "gay" or lesbian person is liable to be charged.
But, overall, she looks askance at the role of public relations in hotels.