look alike

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look alike

1. noun A person or thing that looks very similar to another person or thing. When used as a noun, the term is often hyphenated or spelled as one word. After the product proved immensely popular, a number of cheap lookalikes started popping up all over the place. The TV show had to bring on a look-alike after one of the stars passed away in the middle of filming the third season.
2. verb To look very similar to another person or thing. To be honest, a lot of the small towns in this part of the country look alike. I was so tired and stressed during the exame that all the answers started looking alike. The old bigot said that all people of that ethnicity look alike to him.
See also: alike, look

look alike

to appear similar. All these cars look alike these days. The twins look alike and not many people can tell them apart.
See also: alike, look
References in classic literature ?
Presently I saw a series of doors opening from either side of the corridor, and as they all looked alike to me I tried the first one that I reached.
Anyone remember the song about little boxes - all looking alike and made out of ticky tacky; the people living in them all looked alike, did exactly what they were told while, eventually, their children followed in their footsteps.
To investigate the pros and cons of being a standout, the researchers altered the wasps' facial patterns and set up groups of four unrelated wasp queens, in which three wasps looked alike and one looked distinctively different from the others.
A critic of Huxley's raised the same point in 1869, wondering whether birds and dinosaurs looked alike because they walked upright on their hind legs.
The circles all looked alike. They were round and roly-poly.
The squares all looked alike. They had four sides all the same length.
("You're a killer of art, you're a killer of beauty," de Kooning told him.) For what it's worth, Warhol and Hume even looked alike, or would have if Hume had had access to diet pills.
Residues from the Iranian and Egyptian jars looked alike and were full of tartaric acid, a chemical naturally abundant only in grapes.