look to (one's) laurels

(redirected from look to their laurels)

look to (one's) laurels

To actively maintain one's favorable position when faced with competition. ("Laurels" are achievements or honors.) If John wants to maintain his lead in the triathlon, he's going to have to look to his laurels. Sure, the recruiter likes you, but there are many good candidates for this job, so you better look to your laurels.
See also: laurel, look

look to one's laurels

Fig. to take care not to lower or diminish one's reputation or position, especially in relation to that of someone else potentially better. With the arrival of the new member of the football team, James will have to look to his laurels to remain as the highest scorer. The older members of the team will have to look to their laurels when the new players arrive.
See also: laurel, look

look to one's laurels

Protect one's preeminent reputation or position, especially against a threat of being surpassed. For example, Your opponent's done very well in the practice, so you'd better look to your laurels in the actual game . This idiom alludes to laurels as the traditional material for making a victor's crown. [Late 1800s]
See also: laurel, look

look to your laurels

If you say that someone should look to their laurels, you mean that they should continue to work hard to remain successful, especially when someone else is starting to compete with them. Note: In ancient Greece, the laurel or bay tree was associated with the god Apollo. The winning competitors in the Pythian games, which were held in honour of Apollo, were given crowns or wreaths of laurel. With so many promising young tennis players around, the 25-year-old champion must now look to his laurels. The establishment of new technology across Europe will force them to look to their laurels.
See also: laurel, look

look to your laurels

be careful not to lose your superior position to a rival.
See also: laurel, look

look to your ˈlaurels

do something to protect your good position or reputation from competition by others: He thinks he’s the best in the class but there’s a new girl who is very good. He’s going to have to look to his laurels.
See also: laurel, look
References in periodicals archive ?
Thompson, yet to post a topfive this year, is passed over but Kim, another 19-year-old who has opened her Major account - and at the first attempt, in the Evian Championship last autumn - is showing the form to make Ko, Park and Lewis look to their laurels.
Yes, most certainly the existing incumbents of the mini genre such as the legendary Mini itself, the Fiat 500, Suzuki Swift, et al, are perhaps going to have to look to their laurels a little, for here is quite a smooth operator which is aiming to make a hit in the city car ranks.
It's now one of the sector's class-leaders, good enough to make other brands look to their laurels.
Small businesses are in fact already very energy efficient, and it is the larger ones and the public sector that need to look to their laurels.
And it could make Aston Martin and Ferrari look to their laurels.
I think the ambulance service needs to look to their laurels.
But now that the skimmers are no longer so tightly shoaled up, the front four will have to look to their laurels when the second leg is fought out on Sunday.
As he and Jordana step confidently into the celebrity limelight, Posh and Becks had better look to their laurels.
As Switzerland's corporate scene falls in-line with demands for better performance and more transparency in business dealings chief executives and chairmen alike must look to their laurels.
Yet they will all have to look to their laurels should Aidan O'Brien drop the remarkably versatile former Australian champion So You Think back to a mile.
Jaguar's new X-Type has made BMW, Audi, Mercedes and Lexus look to their laurels.
That won't wash with Sir Frank - and with Jensen Button once again looking a star in the making at Renault, the Williams boys had best look to their laurels.
It's one of the few restaurants in the UK that makes the Froggies look to their laurels.
However, they may all have to look to their laurels to hold Sir Robert Ogden's Cashelgar (Royer-Dupre/Gerald Mosse), who was narrowly beaten into second by Glass Harmonium in the Hampton Court Stakes at Royal Ascot last time.