look to (someone or something)

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look to (someone or something)

1. To depend on someone to provide something. Students look to their professors for guidance.
2. To expect something to happen. I look to get a response today.
See also: look
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

look to someone or something (for something)

to expect someone or something to supply something. Children look to their parents for help. Tom looked to the bank for a loan.
See also: look
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

look to

1. Pay attention to, take care of, as in You'd best look to your own affairs. [c. 1300]
2. Anticipate or expect, as in We look to hear from her soon. [c. 1600]
3. look to be. Seem to be, promise to be, as in This looks to be a very difficult assignment. [Mid-1700s]
See also: look
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

look to

v.
1. To rely on someone or something: He looks to his parents for support when things get tough.
2. To expect or hope for something: She looked to hear from the doctor within a week.
See also: look
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The several levels of governments themselves often look to one another to share the costs of many health, social and cultural programs.
As this elite stabilized in the early eighteenth century, its members tended to look to one another as they married, lent and borrowed money, and presided over Maryland society as governing officials.
Consider that, according to a new report, 2-to-5-day-old infants already home in on faces that fix them with a direct gaze and devote less attention to faces with eyes that look to one side.