look to (one's) laurels

(redirected from look to her laurels)

look to (one's) laurels

To actively maintain one's favorable position when faced with competition. ("Laurels" are achievements or honors.) If John wants to maintain his lead in the triathlon, he's going to have to look to his laurels. Sure, the recruiter likes you, but there are many good candidates for this job, so you better look to your laurels.
See also: laurel, look
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

look to one's laurels

Fig. to take care not to lower or diminish one's reputation or position, especially in relation to that of someone else potentially better. With the arrival of the new member of the football team, James will have to look to his laurels to remain as the highest scorer. The older members of the team will have to look to their laurels when the new players arrive.
See also: laurel, look
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

look to one's laurels

Protect one's preeminent reputation or position, especially against a threat of being surpassed. For example, Your opponent's done very well in the practice, so you'd better look to your laurels in the actual game . This idiom alludes to laurels as the traditional material for making a victor's crown. [Late 1800s]
See also: laurel, look
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

look to your laurels

If you say that someone should look to their laurels, you mean that they should continue to work hard to remain successful, especially when someone else is starting to compete with them. Note: In ancient Greece, the laurel or bay tree was associated with the god Apollo. The winning competitors in the Pythian games, which were held in honour of Apollo, were given crowns or wreaths of laurel. With so many promising young tennis players around, the 25-year-old champion must now look to his laurels. The establishment of new technology across Europe will force them to look to their laurels.
See also: laurel, look
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

look to your laurels

be careful not to lose your superior position to a rival.
See also: laurel, look
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

look to your ˈlaurels

do something to protect your good position or reputation from competition by others: He thinks he’s the best in the class but there’s a new girl who is very good. He’s going to have to look to his laurels.
See also: laurel, look
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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Lorena had to look to her laurels in the second half of last year when young Asian tigresses, led by Korea's Ji-Yai Shin and Taiwan's
CHARLIE Dimmock will have to look to her laurels, with youngsters like seven- year-old Caroline Baldacci already making their mark in the gardening business.
Antonia Fraser had better look to her laurels. And as for the pretentious nonsense at the end: "There was no mistaking it, the Virgin Mary was a warrior first, a mother second.
JESSICA REID, teenage daughter of former jockey John Reid, may have to look to her laurels, for her prominence as racing's very own songbird is about to be challenged.