long in the tooth


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long in the tooth

Fig. old. That actor is getting a little long in the tooth to play the romantic lead. I may be long in the tooth, but I'm not stupid.
See also: long, tooth

long in the tooth

Getting on in years, old, as in Aunt Aggie's a little long in the tooth to be helping us move. This expression alludes to a horse's gums receding with age and making the teeth appear longer. [Mid-1800s]
See also: long, tooth

long in the tooth

If you describe someone or something as long in the tooth, you mean that they are getting old, often too old for a particular activity or purpose. I'm a bit long in the tooth to start being a student. Their cars are looking rather long in the tooth, with the last model launched over 10 years ago. Note: This expression refers to the fact that you can judge the age of a horse by looking at its teeth. As horses get older, their teeth look longer because their gums are receding.
See also: long, tooth

long in the tooth

rather old.
This phrase was originally used of horses, referring to the way their gums recede with age.
See also: long, tooth

(be) ˌlong in the ˈtooth

(humorous, especially British English) old: I’m a bit long in the tooth for all-night parties.This idiom refers to the fact that some animals’ teeth keep growing as they grow older.
See also: long, tooth

long in the tooth

Growing old.
See also: long, tooth

long in the tooth

Old. Absent conclusive documentation, a horse's age is determined by the size and condition of its teeth, which show specific signs of growth or deterioration over the years. For example, a groove in an upper incisor usually first appears when a horse is ten, moves halfway down the tooth in five years, reaches the end in another five, and then begins to disappear. There are far more flattering ways to refer to someone as being “long in the tooth”—to the extent that any reference to age is flattering—such as the French euphemism “a woman of a certain age.”
See also: long, tooth