long face

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long face

A facial expression denoting sadness, dissappointment, or dissatisfaction. Jill had such a long face yesterday after she learned that she failed her exam. Hey, kiddo, why the long face? Is something bothering you?
See also: face, long
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

long face

A facial expression showing sadness or disappointment, as in Greg's long face was a clear indication of his feelings. [Late 1700s]
See also: face, long
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a long face

If someone has a long face, they look very serious or unhappy. He came to me with a very long face and admitted there had been an error. There were some long faces in Paris that day. Astoundingly, an American had won the Tour de France. Note: You can also say that someone is long-faced. After a short ceremony we stood, long-faced, by the graveside.
See also: face, long
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

(pull, wear, etc.) a long ˈface

(have) a sad or disappointed expression: I asked him if he wanted to come out but he pulled a long face and said no.Why the long face?
See also: face, long
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a long face, to wear/draw/pull

To look sad or dissatisfied. A common expression in the nineteenth century, it no doubt came from the elongated look resulting from the mouth being drawn down at the corners and the eyes downcast.
See also: draw, long, pull, wear
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in classic literature ?
Every body was punctual, every body in their best looks: not a tear, and hardly a long face to be seen.
Sancho, as has been already said, was the only one who was distressed, unhappy, and dejected; and so with a long face he went in to his master, who had just awoke, and said to him:
"And you, by your long face, should be a Whig?"[13]
The title of her exhibition arose from hearing the old joke about a horse walking into a bar and the barman asking:'Why the Long Face?' Once Alison had chosen this title, she began to think about other animals with long faces, about sad faces, and about unnaturally elongated faces.
THERE'LL be no long faces around when telly comedian Marcus Brigstocke heads for Teesside.
SHANE LONG faces a race against time to play in the Republic of Ireland's Euro 2016 play-off.
They would pull long faces and strenuously advise him not to.
Being Miserable SOME folk delight in always being sad, You know, the always long faces drive me mad.
Photographers who went to Derek Wilson and his wife Sheila's ex-council house in Thornton, Fife, initially thought they had the wrong address, given the long faces which greeted them.
Irwin, the vicar of Duffield, Derbyshire, said during a Mothering Sunday sermon that "Long faces and nagging did not get you your husband, and long faces and nagging will not keep them.'
Jonathan Fear, editor of the Vital Villa fans' website, said: "It was a good positive, open meeting and I don't think anyone left with long faces."
Jonathan Fear, editor of the Vital Villa fans' website, said: "It was a good positive, open meeting and I don't think anyone left with long faces. Some might look at this as a cynical PR exercise but Alex McLeish wanted to meet some of the fans and put his points across and listen to what people had to say."
Of the two clubs' leading goalscorers, Reading's Shane Long faces a fitness test, QPR's Adel Taarabt is a far less effective threat away from home and teammate Jamie Mackie, who made a blistering start to the season, is out with a broken leg.
The gravement of this offence is that a police doctor is faced with the fact that he used these words and we are all sitting here with long faces."
Perhaps because religious people go around with long faces! James, in his Letter, says: "Is anyone among you in good spirits?