loiter with intent

loiter with intent

1. obsolete In law, to stand or wait idly in a location with the intent to commit an offence. Primarily heard in UK. The police officers arrested the two men, accusing them of loitering with intent to rob tourists coming out of the nearby pubs.
2. By extension, to stand idly in one spot while waiting for something to occur. Primarily heard in UK. We just had to stand there by the kerbside loitering with intent while we waited for him to pick us up.
See also: intent, loiter

loiter with intent

stand or wait around with the intention of committing an offence. British
This is a legal phrase which derives from an 1891 Act of Parliament; it is also used figuratively and humorously of anyone who is waiting around for some unspecified purpose.
See also: intent, loiter
References in periodicals archive ?
God is calling you to loiter with intent at the crossroads.
To loiter with intent might be a crime, and this lively account of the literature of loitering is anything but, unless the intent is to elude intent.