loggerhead

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at loggerheads

In conflict. A "logger" is a 16th-century term for a block of wood, so a "loggerhead" is a blockhead or fool. They are at loggerheads over the best way to lead the committee.
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at loggerheads over (something)

To be in conflict or disagreement with someone for some particular reason. A "logger" is a 16th-century term for a block of wood, so a "loggerhead" is a blockhead or fool. They are at loggerheads over the best way to lead the committee.
See also: loggerhead, over

at loggerheads with (someone)

To be in conflict or disagreement with someone. A "logger" is a 16th-century term for a block of wood, so a "loggerhead" is a blockhead or fool. Ugh, I'm at loggerheads with Taylor over the best way to lead the committee.
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be at loggerheads

To be in conflict. A "logger" is a 16th-century term for a block of wood, so a "loggerhead" is a blockhead or fool. They are at loggerheads over the best way to lead the committee.
See also: loggerhead

be at loggerheads with (one) (over something)

To be in a conflict or dispute with one (over some issue). A "logger" is a 16th-century term for a block of wood, so a "loggerhead" is a blockhead or fool. Tom is at loggerheads with the other members over the best way to lead the committee. I've been at loggerheads with the neighbors all summer because of their obnoxious dogs.
See also: loggerhead
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

at loggerheads (with someone)

 and at loggerheads over something
Fig. in conflict with someone; having reached an impasse (about something). Tom is at loggerheads with Bill. We are at loggerheads with each other. The twins were at loggerheads over who should take the larger room.
See also: loggerhead
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

at loggerheads

Engaged in a quarrel or dispute, as in The two families were always at loggerheads, making it difficult to celebrate holidays together . This term may have come from some earlier meaning of loggerhead, referring either to a blockhead or stupid person, or to a long-handled iron poker with a bulb-shaped end that was heated in the fire and used to melt pitch. If it was the latter, it may have been alluded to as a weapon. [Late 1600s] For a synonym, see at odds.
See also: loggerhead
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

at loggerheads

COMMON If one person or group is at loggerheads with another, they strongly disagree about something. Social workers and doctors are at loggerheads over how well the new system will work. Trevor and his ex-wife Becky ended up at loggerheads — this time having a shouting match on the doorstep. Note: In medieval times, loggerheads were implements with long handles and a round bowl on one end. In battles, the bowl was filled with hot tar, and then thrown at the enemy.
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Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

at loggerheads

in violent dispute or disagreement.
This expression is possibly a use of loggerhead in the late 17th-century sense of ‘a long-handled iron instrument for heating liquids and tar’; the tool was perhaps also used as a weapon.
See also: loggerhead
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at ˈloggerheads (with somebody) (over something)

disagreeing or arguing very strongly (with somebody): The students are at loggerheads with the college over the price of food in the cafeteria.Management and staff are at loggerheads over the plan.In the past, a loggerhead was a long iron instrument which may have been used as a weapon.
See also: loggerhead
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at loggerheads

Engaged in a dispute: The question of car privileges put Sam and his parents at loggerheads.
See also: loggerhead
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

at loggerheads, to be

To disagree, dispute, or quarrel. A logger was a heavy wooden block, and one meaning of “loggerhead” is “blockhead,” a stupid person or dolt. Possibly this meaning led to the phrase “at loggerheads,” with the idea that only dolts would engage in a quarrel. Shakespeare used the word as an adjective in The Taming of the Shrew (4.1): “You loggerheaded and unpolish’d grooms.” The full current expression appeared in the late seventeenth century.
See also: to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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