lodge

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lodge (something) against

1. To formally make a charge or accusation against someone or something. If you have an issue with something we're doing, the best course of action is to lodge a complaint against it with the HR department right away. The company has so far not lodged charges against the former executive, although a spokesperson said they are still considering that as an option.
2. To wedge or prop something forcefully against something else. Be sure to lodge a large stone or block of wood against each tire so that the car doesn't roll while you're working on it. She lodged a chair against the door so the intruder couldn't open it.
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lodge (something) in(to) (something)

To wedge or jam something forcefully in(to something else). She lodged the bag of money in the air vents, intending to collect it later. He lodged a crowbar into the wheel to keep it from turning.
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lodge in

1. To become wedged, jammed, or stuck into some tight space. I thought the car would fit, but it ended up lodging in the narrow alleyway. The fabric got caught on the machinery and lodged in.
2. To jam or lodge someone or something into some tight space. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lodge" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. The table kept wobbling, so I lodged in a napkin under one of the legs. I was lodged in my seat for the entire performance. She lodged her hand in the opening to stop the leak.
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lodge into (something)

1. To become wedged, jammed, or stuck into some tight space. Often used in passive constructions. I thought the car would fit, but it ended up lodging into the narrow alleyway. The fabric got caught on the machinery and lodged into the gears.
2. To jam or lodge someone or something into some tight space. A noun or pronoun can be used between "lodge" and "in"; often used in passive constructions. The table kept wobbling, so I lodged a napkin into the gap underneath one of the legs. I was lodged into my seat for the entire performance. She lodged her hand into the opening to stop the leak.
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lodge with

1. To formally inform a person or body or authority of some charge or accusation against someone or something. A noun or pronoun is usually used between "lodge" and "with." If you have an issue with something, the best course of action is to lodge a complaint with the HR department right away. After being hit in the face at the bar, Jeff lodged an assault charge with local police and ended up getting nearly $200,000 from the guy who punched him.
2. To stay in someone's home or accommodation for a temporary period of time. Janet's brother is going to be lodging with us for a couple of weeks while he looks for a job and apartment of his own after he moves.
3. To instruct, direct, or compel someone to stay in someone's home or accommodation for a temporary period of time. A noun or pronoun is used between "lodge" and "with." We're lodging Janet's brother with us for a couple of weeks while he looks for a job and apartment of his own after he moves.
4. To make a deposit of a cash or check at a financial institution. A noun or pronoun is usually used between "lodge" and "with." Primarily heard in UK. Be sure to lodge the required funds with your local bank before the repayment falls due each month.
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lodge someone with someone

to have someone stay with someone as a guest. We lodged the visitor with George for the weekend. Would it be possible for us to lodge Mary with you?
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lodge something against someone

to place a charge against someone. The neighbors lodged a complaint against us for walking on their grass. I want to lodge an assault charge against Randy.
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lodge something against something

to place or prop something against something. We lodged the chest against the door, making it difficult or impossible to open. Let's lodge the stone against the side of the barn to help support it.
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lodge something in something

to get something stuck in something or some place. She lodged her coat in the door and tore it. He lodged a screwdriver in the machine's gears by accident.
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lodge with someone

to stay or reside with someone. I lodged with my cousin while I was in Omaha. Tricia plans to lodge with us while she is here.
See also: lodge
References in classic literature ?
Tell her the lodge of Mahtoree is very large, and that it is not full.
The Master of Life has said to me, Live alone; your lodge shall be the forest; the roof of your wigwam, the clouds.
He does not say, My lodge is empty and there is room for another; but shall I build, and will the virgin show me near what spring she would dwell?
In this manner had he wooed her from the lodge of her father, and it was to listen to similar pictures of the renown and deeds of the greatest brave in her tribe, that she had shut her ears to the tender tales of so many of the Sioux youths.
As the Teton turned to leave his lodge, in the manner just mentioned, he found this unexpected and half-forgotten object before him.
Wrapping his robe again about him, the Teton motioned to the trapper to follow, and stalked haughtily from the lodge, muttering, as he went--
Tachechana pressed a kiss on the lips of her son, and withdrew to the farther side of the lodge. Here she drew her light calico robe over her head, and took her seat, in token of humility, on the naked earth.
Though not a hand had been extended to greet him, nor yet an eye had condescended to watch his movements, he had also entered the lodge, as though impelled by a fate to whose decrees he submitted, seemingly, without a struggle.
The whole shuddering group of spectators glided from the lodge like troubled sprites; and Duncan thought that he and the yet throbbing body of the victim of an Indian judgment had now become its only tenants.
When the drinks which followed the ceremony of initiation had all been disposed of, the business of the lodge proceeded.
"The first business on the agenda paper," said McGinty, "is to read the following letter from Division Master Windle of Merton County Lodge 249.
You will remember that your lodge owes us a return, having had the service of two brethren in the matter of the patrolman last fall.
Speaking of that, two brothers from the Merton lodge are coming over to us next week to do some business in this quarter."
"I would say, Eminent Bodymaster, that if a man should be wanted I should take it as an honour to be chosen to help the lodge."
"I would move," said the secretary, Harraway, a vulture-faced old graybeard who sat near the chairman, "that Brother McMurdo should wait until it is the good pleasure of the lodge to employ him."