locking


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lock lips (with someone)

To kiss (someone) passionately and at length. I'll never forget locking lips with my wife for the very first time. OK, you two, quit locking lips—our train is about leave.
See also: lip, lock

lock horns

To fight or clash with someone There's always tension between those two—they lock horns over everything.
See also: horn, lock

lock in

1. To be physically locked or trapped inside a particular place or thing. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "lock" and "in." The doorknob came right off in my hand, so I'm stuck outside while the kids are locked in the house!
2. To commit someone or something to a contract. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "lock" and "in." If you sign that contract, you'll be locked into your lease for two years.
3. To secure particular terms for the length of a contract or other such agreement. Call the cable company and see if you can lock in a lower rate.
4. To be involved in a fight or struggle. If those two get locked in on politics, we'll be hearing about nothing but conservatism and liberalism all night long.
5. To focus on something. Oh, I locked in on that delicious cake the minute I stepped into the party!
See also: lock

lock horns (with someone)

Fig. to get into an argument with someone. Let's settle this peacefully. I don't want to lock horns with the boss. The boss doesn't want to lock horns either.
See also: horn, lock

lock (someone or an animal) (up) in (something)

 and lock (someone or an animal) up
to fasten the opening to something so someone, a group, or an animal cannot get out. Take Chuck and lock him up in the cell. Lock up the killer and throw away the key!
See also: lock

lock something in

to make something, such as a rate of interest, permanent over a period of time. You should try to lock in a high percentage rate on your bonds. We locked in a very low rate on our mortgage.
See also: lock

lock horns

Become embroiled in conflict, as in At the town meeting Kate and Steve locked horns over increasing the property tax. This expression alludes to how stags and bulls use their horns to fight one another. [First half of 1800s]
See also: horn, lock

lock in

1. Enclose, surround, as in The ship was completely locked in ice. [c. 1400s]
2. Also, lock into. Fix firmly in position, commit to something. This phrase often occurs as be locked in or into , as in She felt she was locked in a binding agreement, or Many of the stockholders are locked into their present positions. [Mid-1900s]
See also: lock

lock horns

If you lock horns with someone, you argue or fight with them. He has often locked horns with lawmakers as well as the administration. In Manhattan's densely built real estate market, developers and preservationists often lock horns. Note: The reference here is to two male animals, such as deer, fighting over a female and getting their horns caught together or `locked'.
See also: horn, lock

lock horns

engage in conflict.
The image here is of two bulls fighting head-to-head with their horns. Both the literal and figurative senses of the phrase originated in the USA, in the mid 19th century.
See also: horn, lock

ˌlock ˈhorns (with somebody) (over something)

argue or fight with somebody: The lawyers did not want to lock horns with the judge.This idiom refers to the way that animals such as bulls, stags (= male deer), etc. fight with their horns or antlers.
See also: horn, lock

lock in

v.
1. To lock a door to a place leaving someone or something inside: My parents often locked me in my bedroom as punishment. We accidentally locked in the cat when we left.
2. To guarantee something for the duration of a contract: You can lock in this interest rate for the life of the loan. When interest rates fell, I locked them in at a lower rate.
3. To bind someone by contract: The contract locks us in for two years, during which time we cannot work for anyone else. Once you sign the agreement, you will be locked in for the next ten years.
4. To invest some money in such a way that it cannot easily be converted into cash. Used chiefly in the passive: The money is locked in until I turn 65.
5. To bind in close struggle or battle. Used chiefly in the passive: The wrestlers were locked in combat. The two sides were locked in a heated debate.
6. lock in on To focus on someone or something; target someone or something: The fighter pilot locked in on an enemy target and fired. The review locked in on the crude set design and failed to mention the great acting.
See also: lock

lock horns

To become embroiled in conflict.
See also: horn, lock

lock horns

To get into an argument. Two deer, moose, or members of another antlered species who have a dispute they want to settle will face off, paw the ground, and charge at each other. Their antlers clash and often become enmeshed. They have locked horns. People who have a bone to pick can be said to lock horns too. The phrase appears in an 1865 poem by Algernon Swinburne to describe the domestic disagreement of a heifer and her mate locking horns.
See also: horn, lock
References in periodicals archive ?
The selection of locking primitives is affected by two design forces:
Larger granularities of parallelism result in faster and better-scaling programs, favoring lower-overhead locking primitives.
Contention is important because locking primitives that are least affected by memory latency under low contention impose the heaviest memory-bandwidth load under high contention.
You can protect an infrequently changed data structure with lower-overhead locking primitives than those that can be used for a frequently modified data structure.
Indexes to Patterns for Selecting Locking Primitives
The Innovation entries denote problematic contexts in which good performance requires either ad hoc locking primitives or a redesign.
Problem: What locking primitive (s) should you use?
Solution: Use a locking primitive based on test-and-set as shown in Figure 2.
Resulting context: A program with locking primitives that consume little memory and cause little memory traffic under light load.
Design rationale: The simplicity of test-and-set locks pays off if your design enforces low contention (perhaps through the data locking, data ownership, parallel fastpath, hierarchical locking, or allocator caches design pattern).
Resulting context: A program with locking primitives that enforce fairness and limit their memory-bandwidth load while allowing reads to proceed in parallel.
Design rationale: Explicitly tracking the number of readers and writers provides a simple reader-writer locking mechanism.
Hydraulic pressure alone, without a mechanical locking mechanism, holds the clamp shut.
Gabriel Technologies of Omaha, Neb, develops proprietary technology for, and manufactures and sells, a series of physical locking systems for the transportation/shipping industry collectively known as the WAR-LOK Security System.
We were looking for a locking system that would let us maintain a schedule of when people could enter and have control over who did enter," explains Jim Amrine, Assistant Manager of Energy and Controls at the university.