lock out


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lock out

1. To lock the doors or other entrances into some building or so that someone or something is unable to enter from the outside. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "lock" and "out." I can't believe she locked me out of the house, just because I drunkenly kissed some girl at the bar! The car comes with a new feature that makes it impossible to lock yourself out. The factory was shuttered overnight, the owners having locked out all of the employees.
2. To prevent employees from coming to work or performing their duties during a labor dispute. The factory gates were chained shut, a clear sign to the workers that the owners had locked them all out. All electricians in the union will be locked out of further work until the dispute has been resolved.
See also: lock, out

lock someone or something out of something

 and lock someone or something out
to lock something to prevent someone or something from getting into it. Someone locked me out of my office. Who locked out the office staff this morning?
See also: lock, of, out

lock out

1. Keep out, prevent from entering. For example, Karen was so angry at her brother that she locked him out of the house. [Late 1500s] Shakespeare had it in The Comedy of Errors (4:1): "For locking me out of my doors by day."
2. Withhold work from employees during a labor dispute, as in The company threatened to lock out the strikers permanently. [Mid-1800s]
See also: lock, out

lock out

v.
1. To prevent someone or something from entering a place by locking a door or entrance: The committee locked out the protesters from the meeting hall. I left the keys in the car and accidentally locked myself out.
2. To withhold work from some employees during a labor dispute: The company bosses locked the auto workers out. The management will lock out the pilots' union until an agreement is reached.
3. To exclude someone from something, as a competition. Used chiefly in the passive: Professional athletes were locked out of the competition.
See also: lock, out
References in periodicals archive ?
DEALMAKERS have been working hard delivering deals that have attracted less overt publicity than in recent years, due in the main to PR lock outs, disguising the volume of deal activity in the market.
NASRIA is the only insurer in the country providing cover against damage to property and consequential loss caused by, among others, riot or civil commotion; strikes, lock outs and labour disturbances; acts to overthrow the government or any local authority with force or by means of fear, terrorism or violence; acts with a political objective or to bring about social or economic change, or in protest against (authority) or for the purpose of inspiring fear in any section of the public.
"At long last however, the State Government have given the police the power to get on top of the situation; such as lock outs at the venues after 12 am (they can't get back in) and removal of glasses (they have to drink from plastic cups).
Matt O'Connor, of Fathers for Justice, said: 'We are getting reports that somewhere in the region of 100 courts in the UK are being affected, either in rooftop protests or in lock outs.'
Then, they can handle calls for motorist assists, complaints about animals, and vehicle lock outs on their own.