lobby

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Related to lobbyer: lobbyist

lobby against (someone or something)

To try to influence someone, especially an elected official or group of elected officials, against someone or something. A number of high-profile corporations have been lobbying against the supreme court nominee. We've been lobbying against legislation aimed at tightening voter access for the last half a century.
See also: lobby

lobby for (someone or something)

To try to influence someone, especially an elected official or group of elected officials, on behalf or in favor of someone or something. A number of high-profile corporations have been lobbying for a supreme court judge with a proven track record of pro-business decisions. We will continue to lobby for common-sense drug enforcement policies as long as people are still being imprisoned for unreasonable lengths of time for such minor infractions.
See also: lobby
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

lobby against something

to solicit support against something, such as a piece of legislation or a government regulation. We sent a lot of lawyers to the state capital to lobby against the bill, but it passed anyway. They lobbied against the tax increase.
See also: lobby

lobby for something

to solicit support for something among the members of a voting body, such as the Congress. Tom is always lobbying for some reform bill or other. The manufacturers lobbied for tax relief.
See also: lobby
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Our premise is that there may be habitual lobbyers and occasional lobbyers.
We postulate that, on a year-by-year basis, these firm characteristics and market performance variables should affect occasional lobbyers' behavior, but not that of habitual lobbyers.
For habitual lobbyers, past lobbying should be much more important to the extent that it may be the only significant determinant of current lobbying for that group.
Overall, a quick scan of the data suggests that lobbyers are larger, more concentrated in steel production, and have invested less in modernizing their plant and equipment.
In the one-pool model, lobbyers tend to be larger firms that are more concentrated in steel production and that have declining market performance and low levels of investment in productivity improvements.
When we allow the data to form two pools (i.e., K = 2), our firms appear to cleanly sort themselves into habitual and occasional lobbyers. In the first pool, past lobbying positively and highly significantly affects the probability of current lobbying.
We hypothesize that the first pool contains habitual lobbyers and the second contains occasional lobbyers.
The three-pool model distinguishes two groups, the first and third, with lobbying determinants similar to those of occasional and habitual lobbyers in the two-pool model.