loan

(redirected from loans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to loans: Personal loans, Cash loans

float a loan

1. To receive a loan of money from someone or some institution. I had to float a loan to pay for the medical expenses. Thankfully they were able to float a loan and implement the repairs and upgrades the health inspector had demanded.
2. To give, or arrange for someone to give, a loan of money to someone else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used after "float." I'd be happy to float you a loan to help get your business off the ground. The house needs a lot of work, so they're looking around at creditors who might be willing to float them a loan.
See also: float, loan

loan (something) to (one)

To allow someone to borrow or make use of something temporarily. Some linguists, especially in British English, believe that "loan" should only be used as a noun, while the correct verb is only "lend." Primarily heard in US. I can loan $20 to you, but I'll need it back by this weekend. Would you mind loaning your pencil to me? I forgot to bring one. The bank agreed to loan the money for the refurbishments to our company.
See also: loan

on loan

Given to someone on a temporary basis. We've got a backhoe on loan from Mike's construction company to help dig a ditch through the field at the back of the house. We're delighted to announce that we will have The Mona Lisa on loan from the Louvre.
See also: loan, on

take out a loan

To receive a loan of money from creditors or a financial institution. I had to take out a loan to pay for the medical expenses. Thankfully they were able to take out a loan and implement the repairs and upgrades the health inspector had demanded.
See also: loan, out, take

loan (something) out (to one)

To allow someone to borrow or make use of something temporarily. Normally not used in reference to money. Some linguists, especially in British English, believe that "loan" should only be used as a noun, while the correct verb is only "lend." I can't come pick you up tonight—I loaned the car out to your brother. I stopped loaning my books out to friends because I never get them back.
See also: loan, out

float a loan

Fig. to get a loan of money; to arrange for a loan of money. I couldn't afford to pay cash for the car, so I floated a loan. They needed money, so they had to float a loan.
See also: float, loan

loan something to someone

to lend something to someone. (Considered to be an error for lend.) Can you loan a few bucks to Sam and me? I will not loan anything to you.
See also: loan

on loan (from someone or something)

[of possession] temporarily granted by someone or some group. This lovely painting is on loan from the Kimble Museum for the rest of the year.
See also: loan, on

take out a loan

to get a loan of money, especially from a bank. Mary took out a loan to buy a car. We will have to take out a loan to remodel the kitchen.
See also: loan, out, take

loan out

v.
To lend something; loan something: I loaned out my cookbook to my neighbor. The school loaned a computer out to us.
See also: loan, out
References in classic literature ?
That was proved by the very handsome way in which he had behaved in the matter of a small loan when, looking in at the casino after parting from Ruth, he had found Mr Warden in sore straits for want of a little capital to back a brand-new system which he had conceived through closely observing the run of the play.
Knowing where he could procure the loan, he was by no means equally sure of being able to find the security on which he could borrow the money.
In the meantime Miss Davidson was devising plans to repay the loan.
72 (TD 9021) on loans to participants in qualified retirement plans.
Since 1998, Collegiate Funding Services has facilitated the origination of over $20 billion in education loans and currently manages $12 billion in student loans for more than 460,000 borrowers.
Regulators have made it very clear that they are prepared to condemn a wide variety of lending practices, not just fraudulent high-rate high-fee loans in low-income areas.
Interest-free or low-interest loans were once a popular and successful means of shifting income from parents to children.
Now is a good time to get a handle on your debt since interest rates for Federal Stafford Loans have hit an all-time low.
Unfortunately, these loans often are granted in less than ideal economic situations, increasing the probability of default and inviting Internal Revenue Service scrutiny of any related bad debt deductions.
While loans help you attract more participants, they also add to your plan administrators' workloads and responsibilities and, ultimately, to your administration costs.
Since 1976, the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (HMDA) has required most depository institutions with offices in metropolitan areas to provide data on the geographic location of the home purchase and home improvement loans they originate or buy.
Two loans totaling $2 million for the construction of multi-family projects in Brooklyn, N.
Education loans with competitive interest rates--Federal, Undergraduate, Graduate, Professional and Career/Continuing Education loan programs.