loan (something) to (one)

(redirected from loaned to)

loan (something) to (one)

To allow someone to borrow or make use of something temporarily. Some linguists, especially in British English, believe that "loan" should only be used as a noun, while the correct verb is only "lend." Primarily heard in US. I can loan $20 to you, but I'll need it back by this weekend. Would you mind loaning your pencil to me? I forgot to bring one. The bank agreed to loan the money for the refurbishments to our company.
See also: loan
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

loan something to someone

to lend something to someone. (Considered to be an error for lend.) Can you loan a few bucks to Sam and me? I will not loan anything to you.
See also: loan
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For an S-corp shareholder with insufficient basis to deduct corporate losses, a distribution from a qualified plan (or an IRA) could be loaned to the corporation and free up at-risk losses with the only tax cost being the 10-percent penalty.
When property, other than stock in an S corporation and assets used in its business, is mortgaged as security for a loan, the shareholder will be at risk to the extent of the net FMV of his interest in the mortgaged property.(33) This would permit the use of a mortgage or second mortgage on property owned by the shareholder to obtain at-risk funds that could be loaned to an S corporation.