loaf

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loaf about

To waste time idly; to spend time doing little or nothing. Chris, quit loafing about and help me take out the trash! After the stressful week that I had, I'm looking forward to just loafing about the house for the weekend.
See also: loaf

half a loaf is better than no bread

Getting less than what one wants is better than getting nothing at all. I know they're offering you less money than you'd hoped for, but at least it's a good job—half a loaf is better than no bread.
See also: better, bread, half, loaf, no

half a loaf is better than no loaf

Getting less than what one wants is better than getting nothing at all. I know they're offering you less money than you'd hoped for, but at least it's a good job—half a loaf is better than no loaf.
See also: better, half, loaf, no

loaf around

To waste time being idle; to spend time doing little or nothing. Quit loafing around and help me take out the trash! After the stressful week that I had, I'm looking forward to just loafing around the house for the weekend.
See also: around, loaf

half a loaf

Less than what is desired. This is the abbreviated version of the phrase "half a loaf is better than none." I know they're offering you less money than you'd hoped for, but it's a good job, so I think you should accept half a loaf.
See also: half, loaf

use (one's) loaf

To use one's own intelligence and intellectual ability; to think logically and rationally. In this phrase, "loaf" refers to one's head or brain. Often said as an imperative. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Come on, Dean, I know you can figure this out on your own. Use your loaf! Jenny finally remembered to bring the right books home to do her homework. I'm glad she's finally using her loaf.
See also: loaf, use

half a loaf is better than none

Getting less than what one wants is better than getting nothing at all. I know they're offering you less money than you'd hoped for, but at least it's a good job—half a loaf is better than none.
See also: better, half, loaf, none

Half a loaf is better than none.

Prov. Getting only part of what you want is better than not getting anything. Fred: How did your court case go? Alan: Not good. I asked for $500, and the judge only awarded me $200. Fred: Half a loaf is better than none.
See also: better, half, loaf, none

loaf around

to waste time; to idle the time away doing almost nothing. Every time I see you, you are just loafing around. I enjoy loafing around on the weekend.
See also: around, loaf

loaf something away

to waste away a period of time. You have loafed the entire day away! He loafed away the entire day.
See also: away, loaf

half a loaf is better than none

Something is better than nothing, even if it is less than one wanted. For example, He had asked for a new trumpet but got a used one-oh well, half a loaf is better than none . This expression, often shortened, was already a proverb in 1546, where it was explicitly put: "For better is half a loaf than no bread."
See also: better, half, loaf, none

half a loaf is better than none

If you say that half a loaf is better than none, you mean that it is better to take what you can get, even if it is very little, than to risk having nothing at all. The reforms do not go as far as we wanted. Still, half a loaf is better than none. Note: Other words can be used instead of loaf and none. I'm very disappointed that there will only be one game, but half a loaf is better than no loaf, and we are happy that at least we will be playing once. Is half a step towards democracy better than no step at all?
See also: better, half, loaf, none

half a loaf

not as much as you want but better than nothing.
This phrase alludes to the proverb half a loaf is better than no bread , which has been in use since the mid 16th century.
See also: half, loaf

use your loaf

use your common sense. British informal
This expression probably comes from loaf of bread , rhyming slang for ‘head’.
See also: loaf, use

half a ˌloaf is better than ˈnone/no ˈbread

(saying) you should be grateful for something, even if it is not as good, much, etc. as you really wanted; something is better than nothing: They’re only going to agree to some of this, but half a loaf is better than none, I suppose.
See also: better, bread, half, loaf, no, none
References in periodicals archive ?
The cognitive tendency items describe covert ideas and motivation closely related to social loafing, whereas the behavioral tendency items measure overt loafing behavior.
They were divided into a high social loafing tendency (HSLT) group (n = 35) and a low social loafing tendency (LSLT) group (n = 44).
We demonstrated in this study that the psychometric indices of the SLTQ are acceptable and that it can be used to measure individual social loafing habit responses in various situations.
It is more important, however, that the similarity in the number of uses between the HSLT and LSLT groups in the individual task condition provides strong evidence for the trait nature of the social loafing tendency.
Our findings are significant because we proposed that social loafing might be better considered as a habitual response or a trait variable rather than a state variable.
Social loafing should be less likely under these circumstances since individuals will be more confident that their efforts will be appropriately rewarded (Shepperd, 1993).
While intuitively we might expect them to be similar in that when a supervisor contingently punishes a subordinate for substandard performance, social loafing should be less prevalent, we know from the literature discussed above that punishment appears to have phenomenologically distinct effects from rewards.
On the one hand, contingent punishment sends the signal that social loafing will be noticed and negative consequences may ensue.
The idea that contingent punishment generates competing motives for and against social loafing is also somewhat consistent with Shepperd's (1993) recent motivational analysis of social loafing.
Effects of non-contingent rewards and non-contingent punishments on social loafing
Latane (1986) and Hardy and Latane (1988) contend that social loafing may be a function of the individuals' desire to economize their effort when performing in group situations because they can "hide in the crowd" and escape recognition or blame because their individual efforts are not identifiable.
A particularly surprising omission from the social loafing literature is the failure to document the subjects' emotions or mood state.
One sport that is particularly susceptible to examining social loafing and overcoming the limitations of past studies is competitive crew rowing.
In addition to the virtual absence of elite athletes in previous social loafing research, Hardy and Crace (1991) found that less proficient team members may be more susceptible to social loafing than more skilled members.
Thus, whereas social loafing was not apparent for the two tasks of relatively short duration (one-stroke and 1.