load (something) with (something)

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load (something) with (something)

1. To fill some space or structure with a large or heavy amount of something. Let me know when you're finished loading the van with timber. We'll need a forklift to load the shelves in the warehouse with these pallets of books.
2. To burden something with an excessive amount of something else. Often used in passive constructions. The director loaded the film with so much symbolism that it's hard to figure out what is supposed to be taken literally. Snack cakes like these are loaded with calories.
See also: load
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

load something with something

to burden something with something; to put a lot of something onto or into something. Load this box with all the clothing you can get into it. Don't load these drawers with so much stuff.
See also: load
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
At length the camels were loaded with as much as they could carry, and nothing remained but to seal up the treasure, and go our ways.
An hour's time saw the sled loaded with the ingoing mail and grub, fresh dogs harnessed, and a fresh Indian engaged.
Didn't you once say that whatever ship Ahab sails in, that ship should pay something extra on its insurance policy, just as though it were loaded with powder barrels aft and boxes of lucifers forward?
To produce a more uniform separating force, grates contain magnetic material throughout the tube, and are not partially loaded with springs and fillers.
Originally loaded with a 230-grain ball slug at 810 fps or so, the .45 ACP has evolved into one of the truly great cartridges of all time.
This paper describes the behavior and failure modes of joints loaded with dynamic forces that simulate hurricane wind and impact loads on residential structures.
This results in an emergency panel being loaded with noncritical equipment for which emergency power generation during an outage is unnecessary.
By comparison, my desktop computer--a 66-Mhz 486 with twice the RAM of the laptop--which is loaded with Windows 3.1, could barely handle a quarter of those applications, and certainly it could not perform a defragmentation at the same time.
To produce a more uniform separating three, grates contain magnetic material throughout the tube, and are not partially loaded with springs and fillers.