live to

(redirected from living to)

live to

1. To survive until one is a certain age. In this war-torn region of the world, it is uncommon for most people to live to 40. My grandmother smoked a pack of cigarettes a day and lived to 94 years of age.
2. To live long enough to experience or accomplish something. Typically followed by "see (something)." I hope I live to see the tiny Russian village where my great-great-grandfather was born. I'm just happy my mother lived to see that terrible law finally be repealed.
3. To exist with the sole or primary purpose of doing something. I live to play music—if I wasn't able to do that, I just don't know how I'd survive. Sometimes it feels like my dad only lives to work, because we barely see him at home.
See also: live

live to do something

 
1. to survive long enough to do something. I just hope I live to see them get married and have children. Bill wants to live to see his grandchildren grow up.
2. to exist only to do something. He lives to work. One shouldn't live to eat.
See also: live
References in periodicals archive ?
This removes flexibility and customer choice, the very elements that have helped assisted living to thrive.
One of the great opportunities in bringing assisted living to an urban center is to couple them with medical centers.
To promote the philosophy of independent living to help improve service delivery and community opportunities for persons with severe disabilities;
Likewise, in accord with the "traditional rehabilitation paradigm," VR practitioners consider independent living to be but one part of the field of rehabilitation and vocational rehabilitation.
While other mice were eating as much as they pleased and living to the ripe old age (for mice, at least) of 30 months, N/R.sub.40-243 was among those given 60 percent less Purina Lab Chow.
* Creation of a National Center for Excellence in Assisted Living to analyze and suggest regulations.
Personal assistance is defined as assistance from another person with activities of daily living to compensate for a functional limitation.
As CLTC editors listened to presidents and CEOs of companies whose services range from skilled nursing and assisted living to various degrees of home care, we formed a strong impression that the services available within the next decade will not be "your grandfather's long term care." As seniors begin to take more control of their lives and the decisions involving their care, the continuum is expanding to include a more varied menu of home-and community-based services.
Within less than a year, we've had eight people move from independent living to assisted living.
Many of those members are now adding or looking to add assisted living to their mix.
Or if someone's independence diminishes, he or she can go from independent living to personal care, surrounded by the same friends and familiar faces.
Peck: Why did the Joint Commission decide to add assisted living to the array of healthcare organizations it accredits?
I work with administrators every day, and get to know many from different models of long-term care health.' Once I began to consider these characteristics, though, coming up with three was tougher than I'd expected, mainly because there are vast differences from one model of assisted living to the other.
But nursing home administrators who are considering a change because they perceive assisted living to be "easier" are in for a surprise.
Currently, many states allow assisted living to be provided in buildings that meet local building codes but do not meet Life Safety Code 101.