live in

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live in

1. verb To dwell or reside in something or some place. They've been living in a hotel room ever since the bank repossessed their home. Her sister lives in small apartment attached to the back of their house.
2. verb To dwell or reside at one's place of employment. Hyphenated if used as a modifier before a noun. The staff of the hotel lives in during the busy season.
3. adjective Dwelling or residing at one's place of employment. Usually hyphenated. We hired a live-in nanny to help us during the night time.
See also: live
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

live in (with someone)

[for servants or lovers] to live in a residence that one might be expected only to visit rather than reside in. Their maid lives in with them. She lived in for a few months before they were married.
See also: live

live in something

to dwell within something or some place. They live in the village. She lives in a large house in the country.
See also: live

live in

to live at the residence at which one works. In order to be here early enough to prepare breakfast, the cook has to live in. Mr. Simpson has a valet, but he doesn't live in.
See also: live
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

live in

1. Reside in one's place of employment or schooling, as in They wanted a baby-sitter who could live in, or Joe was planning to live in at the college. This expression is used primarily for domestic servants or students. [Late 1800s] Also see live out.
2. live in something. Continue in existence, memory, or some feeling. This sense appears in such phrases as live in the past, meaning "to concentrate on past memories," or live in hope of, meaning "to continue anticipating that something will happen." For example, Alice lived in the past; she had no interest in current events, or Jim lived in hope of getting a teaching post. Also see live in sin.
See also: live
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

live in

v.
To reside in the place where one is employed: They were wealthy enough to afford household servants who lived in.
See also: live
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
People living in smaller towns/ cities feel they are following the ( lifestyles of) metropolis, when they are only imitating the vices," Basu said.
They demanded of the government to provide proper security to the Hazara community living in Balochistan province and take stern action against the perpetrators of the Quetta tragedy.
"By looking at this demonstration we have come to know what all hardships our Indian Navy goes through in order to ensure the safety of people living in the coastal areas.
Federal agents arrested more than a million people trying to cross in 2004; still, the number of illegal immigrants living in the United States has grown by 23 percent during the first half of this decade, according to a recent Pew Hispanic Center study, and some half a million more take up residence each year.
Immigrants living in the United States face the possibility of deportation without legal representation.
It's alarming to think of the millions of Californians who are so financially insecure--especially given the increasing cost of living in the Golden State.
Shaukat Sindhu, chairman of the Chicago-based Pakistani American Association of North America, said about 15,000 of the roughly 100,000 Pakistanis living in the Chicago area were required to register.
OLD TOWN residents, especially those living in flats, are being warned to step up security after a spate of break-ins.
Being detained by the INS means living in a limbo where little is known, answers are few, and nothing is certain except the tedium of daily life.
"Last summer a White House task force on immigration headed by Secretary of State Colin Powell and Attorney General John Ashcroft went so far as to suggest amnesty for the 4 million or so undocumented Mexican immigrants living in the U.S.
There are more than 7 million illegal immigrants living in the United States, and their work and economic contributions are essential to this nation's economy.
"It's unconscionable" that the government is punishing innocent people for something it "allowed to happen" by not keeping good enough track of suspected terrorists living in the United States.
One, a girl living in the Philippines with her father, begs her migrant mother: "Mom...I need someone guiding and supporting me and that is you.
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