live to

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live to

1. To survive until one is a certain age. In this war-torn region of the world, it is uncommon for most people to live to 40. My grandmother smoked a pack of cigarettes a day and lived to 94 years of age.
2. To live long enough to experience or accomplish something. Typically followed by "see (something)." I hope I live to see the tiny Russian village where my great-great-grandfather was born. I'm just happy my mother lived to see that terrible law finally be repealed.
3. To exist with the sole or primary purpose of doing something. I live to play music—if I wasn't able to do that, I just don't know how I'd survive. Sometimes it feels like my dad only lives to work, because we barely see him at home.
See also: live
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

live to do something

 
1. to survive long enough to do something. I just hope I live to see them get married and have children. Bill wants to live to see his grandchildren grow up.
2. to exist only to do something. He lives to work. One shouldn't live to eat.
See also: live
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
A picture emerges--the monumental challenges of corruption and poverty, and countless examples of brave people using their lives to create a cleaner, calmer, fairer India for all.
It is easy for the responsibilities in this area of our lives to overtake the priorities of family life due to the financial and immediate concerns of running a home.
* Intangible assets other than goodwill may or may not be amortized depending on their useful lives to the entity: Assets with finite lives are amortized; assets with indefinite lives are not.
For our lives to function at a certain level, we need regularity.
They, too, had lives to live--lives perhaps so vibrant that nothing short of nuclear fission would extinguish them.
At the same time, their parents are beginning to ask why they gave 30 or 40 years of their lives to a job and neglected other parts of life, especially as they find themselves downsized and unable to find jobs of comparable status, pay, or security.
Ryan receiving the news of her sons' deaths seem to give a certain nobility to this quest, but as the film goes on, the cast and audience alike find themselves wondering at a moral calculus that would sacrifice seven lives to save one.
The exchange often leads to people generating ideas about what they need to accomplish in their own lives to live more independently.
Bonnell argues that Salutati considers otium and negotium to be inodes of life, and the active and contemplative lives to be stages in the interior ascent of the soul.
We thank God for providing to all, the grace and strength to keep his law of life and to reap the immeasurable benefits which come from conforming our lives to his will.